Watch on YouTube TV

Investigation Discovery

Watch live TV from 70+ networks
Free unlimited cloud DVR storage space
6 accounts per household included
$49.99/month.
Cancel anytime.

Featured shows

Powerfully emotional stories tell of people who have been targets of compulsive stalkers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 6 million people in the U.S. are stalked each year, and in most instances, the stalker is someone the victim already knows. The series' hourlong episodes dramatize actual cases through visceral re-enactments and pointed testimony of victims, family members and law enforcement authorities, revealing what happens when stalkers can't have what -- or who -- they want, and stop at nothing to ensure that no one else can either. The chilling accounts probe the mechanics of an obsessive mind and the devastating impact of delusion.
Veteran journalist Paula Zahn steps out of the studio and into the field to unravel criminal investigations, tracking the drama of each story by featuring the opinions of those closest to the case, including law enforcement officials, the families of the victims and the incarcerated, lawyers from both sides, and first-time TV interviews with convicted murderers.
"It's not like in the movies," police Sgt. David White says, describing his encounter with a gun-wielding suspect that was captured on his body camera. The video is among those featured on this series, which offers unprecedented access to police units that are using this innovative and vital technology in the line of duty. The series takes viewers on the "ultimate ride-along" as they view the life-or-death, split-second decisions that those in law enforcement are forced to make on a daily basis. Each story weaves interviews with responding officers throughout to provide critical context to their decisions and to add additional insight to the life-changing, sometimes tragically fatal, moments.
Investigation Discovery and People magazine partner to re-examine some of the most high profile crime cases in recent history. The one-hour series brings viewers tales of betrayal, buried secrets and unsung heroes, ripped from the pages of one of the nation's top weekly magazines. These stories transcended news and became part of pop culture, revealing shocking twists, new evidence, and unexpected resolutions. Interlaced within every episode are exclusive interviews with People's journalists, archival footage, re-creations, and firsthand accounts by those closest to the investigations.
Told through first-person interviews, stylized recreations and archival footage, ID's true-life crime series, "The Object of Murder," examines murders and the unique items that provided vital clues to the detectives tasked with solving them. In one episode, investigators find a missing woman's online journal that reveals the truth of what happened to her. In another, a man goes missing while duck hunting but leaves behind his boat and shotgun. Each episode showcases a different crime via interviews with loved ones who feel deep emotional connections to the objects that illuminated the events that changed their lives forever.
Never forgetting what happened to loved ones who have been murdered is a way of paying respect, however horrifying and raw those memories may be. The recollections can come in handy too, like when they contain critical clues that help detectives piece together the final hours of the victim's life. This series examines that aspect of homicide cases, with each hourlong story told through the memories of family members, friends, and investigators, plus images from the time of the crime that still haunt and are unforgettable.
Living in a surveillance society means everyday actions are caught on camera, mostly of honest citizens going about their routines. Video, however, doesn't discriminate; criminals also end up on film. "See No Evil" presents dramatic stories of crimes being solved with the aid of surveillance cameras. Testimony from police, eyewitnesses and families are woven into re-enactments bolstered by actual security-camera footage, which helps unlock answers to cases that otherwise might have remained unsolved and left dangerous perpetrators at large.
Using dramatic re-enactments bolstered by police reports and forensic evidence, Investigation Discovery delves into the minds of female killers in "Deadly Women." Each episode focuses on four different cases in which women, for a variety of reasons and with a variety of methods, chose to take the lives of others. Stories featured include more recent cases, like that of Andrea Yates, the Texas woman who in 2001 drowned her five children one by one in the bathtub and then called police, to older cases like that of the "baby farmer" Sarah Makin in 1890s Australia, who killed illegitimate infants left temporarily in her care.
Like a pane of glass cracking in all directions before shattering, the impact of a single crime can create ripple effects that forever alter multiple lives. This Investigation Discovery series unravels actual homicide cases to explore how the past continues to haunt the present for those involved -- loved ones, witnesses, and law enforcement. Each episode is structured around three distinct perspectives of the same crime, and as viewers learn different details by way of first-person interviews and stylized re-enactments, stories, which at first seem random, slowly start to intertwine.
Lt. Joe Kenda spent 23 years in the Colorado Springs Police Department, where he amassed a lifetime of memories catching killers and helping solve close to 400 homicide investigations. The vivid memories are brought back to life in this hourlong series, as Kenda reopens his "Murder Books" for viewers -- folders in which every detail of his murder cases is held -- to revisit the most disturbing cases still haunting him today. As he details the process of how he solved the crimes, Kendra also embarks on a personal journey, coming to terms with long-suppressed nightmares. As he says, "I don't want to tell these stories. I need to."
Dark dreams see the light of day in "Your Worst Nightmare," a typical Investigation Discovery true-crime series complete with jump-out-of-your-seat moments and chilling conclusions. Classic suspense film techniques highlight re-enactments of creepy, harrowing crimes, as victims' darkest dreams become unfathomable realities. Each hourlong episode features one story interlaced with commentary from law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, and psychologists, plus accounts from friends and family of the victim.
With one quick click the internet allows people to share information like family photos and professional accomplishments, making it easy to ignore or forget that behind clever screen names and witty captions is a dark digital world with real dangers and risks. In hour-long episodes, "Web of Lies" unravels tragic stories of deception and manipulation triggered by online interactions, from predators lurking behind Facebook profiles to creeps scouring chat rooms for their victims. Re-enactments are buttressed by comments from law enforcement personnel, true-crime experts and psychologists, plus first-person accounts from friends and families of the victims.
Actual murder cases from the 1950s and '60s get sleek, cinematic treatment in this series, transporting viewers back to a pre-forensics era when sometimes it was more about how suspects looked than what they did that determined guilt. Narrative by a fictional bystander -- who "knew" the victim -- drives the hourlong episodes, while reporters who covered the case explain how the events impacted society. Artfully crafted re-creations play out like period thrillers, staying true to fashions and styles, while spotlighting cultural taboos and social norms surrounding each case.
Like trying to decipher the value of a book without ever opening it, judging a person by his or her outward appearance can be a mistake. Someone may look perfect on the outside, but even the most kind-hearted soul has a dark side looming. "Diabolical" is a 10-episode docuseries that delves into the minds of murderers, asking a simple question: "Why did they do it?" The acts were committed with extreme premeditation -- many were months or even years in the making. Tension builds in each episode as law enforcement taps into the methods of devious masterminds, aided by insights from forensic psychologists and psychiatrists as well as criminal profilers.
Police reconstruct the life of the murder victim piece by piece in order to uncover the shocking truth.
Chilling scenarios unfold in this true-crime series, which tells actual stories of people who shared their lives with loved ones who became killers. Each hourlong episode puts viewers in the shoes of the loved one, who first notices that something is amiss, interprets the puzzling signs and clues, and eventually comes face-to-face with the horrible truth: that the person has a very dark side. Exclusive interviews and firsthand accounts of the critical moments leading up to the vicious acts showcase devastating, often undiscussed consequences on the people who have nurtured, loved and raised a murderer.
Audio recordings from investigations, including police interviews, recorded telephone calls and voicemails.
The power of Investigation Discovery's dedicated fanbase unites with legendary victims' rights advocate John Walsh to continue his lifelong mission to track down fugitives on the run and find missing children. On each hourlong episode, John tells the time-sensitive stories of two fugitives and two missing children, taking viewers on a journey through the eyes of family members, friends and authorities who are desperate for resolution. He is joined by his son, Callahan, who leads the operation on the ground, working in tandem with the community and local authorities to solve the cases.
During his storied career at the Houston Police Department, Detective Fil Waters made a name for himself in the interrogation room as an eminently skillful interviewer capable of getting stunning confessions from close-mouthed criminals. Using his ability to plumb the psyches of suspects and develop successful strategies for systemized interviews, the highly decorated law enforcement officer has helped solve more than 400 murder cases. Now, Detective Waters teaches interrogation techniques to police forces around the country. Known for his smooth-talking style, Waters uses strategic lines of questioning to lay out the facts of the case, leaving the perpetrator with no option but to tell the truth. In ID's "The Interrogator," Detective Waters recalls his most famous cases and showcases his interrogation techniques designed to convince suspects to lower their guards and spit out answers the police never saw coming.
For better and worse, a work environment represents a microcosm of society. While lifelong friendships are formed at a job, and perhaps it's a place where people even meet their future spouses, working alongside others also increases the likelihood that creeps may be close by. "The Killer Beside Me" exposes the dark underbelly of workplace relations, where romantic rivalries and power plays culminate in murders. Cinematic re-enactments form the basis of the true stories, and interviews with family and friends of victims and law enforcement personnel lend support.
Retired Detective Garry McFadden is a 34-year veteran of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) and one of its most decorated law enforcement officers. The dapper detective is also a TV personality who stars in "I Am Homicide." Now, he returns in ID's true-crime series, "Homicide City: Charlotte," to reveal the city's darkest secrets. McFadden and his CMPD colleagues recall their most unforgettable cases and resurrect the most dramatic murders that ever took place in the teeming southern city of Charlotte, N.C.