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Dr. Jan Pol has been a practicing veterinarian for more than half his life. In 1981 he and his wife, Diane, opened a vet business out of their home, and over the years it has grown to service more than 19,000 clients. Set in Central Michigan's farm country, this reality series follows the work done at Pol Veterinary Services. Specializing in large farm animals, Dr. Pol treats horses, pigs, cows, sheep, alpacas, goats, chickens and even an occasional reindeer. The program also features Dr. Brenda Grettenberger, who has worked with Dr. Pol since 1992.
Throughout America's coastline shark attacks are on the rise. Many occur in quick succession at new and surprising locations. As vacationers, scientists and locals are all desperate to uncover what is causing the upsurge, National Geographic Channel investigates the attacks to see what is affecting some of nature's most feared fish. The deep-sea saga employs underwater photography, news archives and testimony to deep dive into mysterious and deadly recent shark attacks.
When bluefin tuna season ends in Gloucester, Mass., it's just beginning in North Carolina's Outer Banks, a perfect opportunity to pit North vs. South in a pro fisherman contest for the ocean's most lucrative prey. Venturing south are the best crews from Gloucester to take on top local fleets in the treacherous Outer Banks, where the weather is more unpredictable than up north, and the seas can be extremely rough. The Gloucester rod-and-reel vets must master "greensticking" -- trolling artificial squid from a 30-foot fiberglass pole to lure the elusive species to the surface. Top-dollar bluefin can be worth as much as $20,000 each, but a short season and small government catch quota means explosive rivalries surface quickly.
How does the drug trade work? Can it be stopped or should it be regulated? And what are the personal costs? Those are just some of the questions asked in this series, a comprehensive look at society's most abused drugs: cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and marijuana. First-person perspectives from traffickers, dealers, users, law enforcement and medical professionals detail how the drugs are processed and moved onto the streets, and the effects they have on the human body. It's a raw, eye-opening documentary about a billion-dollar industry.
Maritime mysteries -- old and new -- come to life in this 10-episode series, combining scientific data and digital re-creations to reveal shipwrecks, treasures, and sunken cities on the bottom of lakes, seas and oceans around the world. Innovative technology allows viewers to see what lies on the floors of large bodies of water such as the Gulf of Mexico, the Nile, the Indian Ocean, the Baltic Sea and the Atlantic Ocean as if they had been drained. Then, in a quest to explain natural wonders and man-made catastrophes, stories tell of how vessels sank, what ancient geological formations reveal about life on Earth, where Nazi secrets now reside, and why so many continue to search for the legendary city of Atlantis.
If the online age has proven anything, it is that people absolutely love to show off their pets. The internet has become a repository for animal videos, which generate millions of "clicks" that produce feel-good, fluffy giggles. One site in particular, Animals Doing Things, boasts close to two million followers, and the content found there is celebrated in this series. Host Howie Mandel collates video submissions from all over the world into hourlong episodes, each narrated with his signature comedy, that showcase animals doing amazing, adorable and hilarious things. Get ready for some viral video catnip, including dancing puppies, wrestling kittens, musical monkeys and acrobatic lizards.
From the award-winning team of filmmaker Darren Aronofsky ("Black Swan") and producer Jane Root ("America the Story of Us"), this 10-part cinematic event series explores the fragility and wonder of planet Earth -- one of the most peculiar, unique places in the universe. Host Will Smith guides viewers on an unprecedented exploration, bolstered by an elite group of eight astronauts who provide unique perspectives and relate personal memoirs of the planet seen from a distance. Hourlong episodes delve into monumental events such as genesis, cosmic violence, human intelligence and alien life, oxygen, and survival vs. destruction.
Patrolling America's largest state is the job of roughly 400 troopers in one of the toughest law enforcement agencies in the nation. Essentially, these cops say, nearly every Alaskan resident is armed and they know how to use their weapons, which makes any scenario a trooper encounters a potentially fatal one. Follow along as the "blue shirt" Alaskan State Troopers police the towns and villages, and the "brown shirt" Alaska Wildlife Troopers enforce regulations covering both commercial and sport fishing and hunting activities.
Experiencing the wildlife of Africa in their natural habitats through daily safari rides.
Put up your dukes -- er, paws -- and prepare to discover epic, bone-shattering clashes between some of the world's deadliest predators. From lions, tigers and bears to meerkats, mongoose and mice, the series features testosterone-induced battles between some of the biggest, baddest and often surprising fighters in the animal kingdom, revealing the extraordinary motivations and strategies that fuel each incredible brawl.
Dream adventures turn into hellish nightmares for the travelers featured in this series, which recounts through firsthand interviews and re-enactments terror-filled experiences of being arrested in a foreign country, usually for drug smuggling, and how they coped with the resulting lengthy prison terms. Viewers also hear from people directly involved with the arrests, whether it's the undercover agents gathering the evidence against the suspects, or the people making the drug dealing offers.
Consistently stunning documentaries transport viewers to far-flung locations ranging from the torrid African plains to the chilly splendors of icy Antarctica. The show's primary focus is on animals and ecosystems around the world. A comic book based on the show, meant to be used an as educational tool for kids, was briefly distributed to museums and schools at no cost in the mid-2000s.
The old Dolly Parton hit "9 to 5" isn't a tune worth humming for the blue-collar pioneers featured in "Filthy Riches." The series spotlights ingenious Americans who skirt a conventional workplace in favor of making a living in the deep rivers, soggy mud flats and wild backwoods of the U.S. Ray Turner, for example, has been catching eels in Delaware for 30 years. He uses a self-made smokehouse in the woods to cook the critters and sell them. Billy Taylor and his sons hunt for prized ginseng root in the Appalachians. Taylor, a fully licensed wild ginseng dealer, promotes sustainability by planting its berries. In Maine, Jim Campbell and Andy Johns make the coastal mud flats their office, as they dig for valuable bloodworms to sell to fishermen. And Greg Dahl and Albert DeSilva are burl hunters. A burl is a hard, unwieldy outgrowth on a tree, usually at the trunk. Burls have value because of the spectacular patterns found in them when cut open.
This series unveils the engineering secrets of various iconic megastructures that went on to spark a technological revolution, ultimately changing warfare forever. The Nazis built some of the biggest and deadliest pieces of military hardware in history. Adolf Hitler hired men like Wernher von Braun, Ferdinand Porsche and Alfred Krupp to build huge terror machines, high-tech superguns and weapons of mass destruction.
Those who lived it and those who tried to kill it reveal in eye-opening detail the world of the U.S. Mafia. Former mobsters -- some speaking on camera for the first time -- informants and FBI agents expose the empire of the deadly, corrupt and unforgiving crime ring that gripped America for decades. Each episode examines a pivotal time frame that began in the 1970s and led to the present, and each makes use of recently declassified files, first-person accounts and archival clips, relating a roller coaster of violence, loyalty and wealth. Mobsters talk about the true meaning of La Cosa Nostra and what tricks they used to stay alive, while law enforcement officials offer rare details of dangerous undercover operations, highlighted by an in-depth interview with FBI legend Joe Pistone, whose five-year infiltration of the Bonanno crime family changed the mob forever.
Each year the U.S. economy is flush with more than $500 billion generated in illegal transactions. From sex, weapons and drugs to gambling and counterfeit merchandise, nothing is off limits and seemingly everything is for sale. In "Underworld, Inc.," National Geographic Channel is granted unprecedented access to this "free" enterprise. Workers, suppliers, sellers, customers -- and law enforcement personnel trying to keep it in check -- share their experiences of an underground industry that is brutal, exploitive and corrupt.
Rituals and customs accepted in one culture may be thought of as downright bizarre in another. "Taboo" delves into that dichotomy, taking viewers across cultural borders to explore traditional beliefs and deliberate lifestyle choices, ranging from body modification and gender decisions to nudity and spiritual quests that test the limits of the human body.
George Wyant and Tim Saylor get down and dirty in this series, which profiles the metal detector enthusiasts and homespun historians as they travel the country uncovering lost pieces of history. From bullets at historic battlegrounds to family heirloom rings and silver coins, the items -- "the juice" or "sweet nectar," as they call it -- often have little monetary value, but then again, Wyant and Saylor don't spend countless hours in a field or on a beach looking to strike it rich. It's the thrill of the hunt, they say, of not knowing what their next quest will unearth, that keeps them digging for more.
Stories from soldiers on the front lines in Afghanistan.
Scientists reveal how adventures turn to misadventures by explaining some spectacular mishaps.
On foot, by car or off-road vehicle, by plane or by boat, the California Game Wardens -- 240 in all -- patrol the state's 159,000 square miles, pursuing poachers, polluters and drug runners around the clock while making sure hunters and anglers follow the rules. No two days are alike, and each is adventure-filled as the officers, working alone or with a canine companion, often patrol sparsely populated areas where help can be hours away.