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Living in a surveillance society means everyday actions are caught on camera, mostly of honest citizens going about their routines. Video, however, doesn't discriminate; criminals also end up on film. "See No Evil" presents dramatic stories of crimes being solved with the aid of surveillance cameras. Testimony from police, eyewitnesses and families are woven into re-enactments bolstered by actual security-camera footage, which helps unlock answers to cases that otherwise might have remained unsolved and left dangerous perpetrators at large.
Veteran journalist Paula Zahn steps out of the studio and into the field to unravel criminal investigations, tracking the drama of each story by featuring the opinions of those closest to the case, including law enforcement officials, the families of the victims and the incarcerated, lawyers from both sides, and first-time TV interviews with convicted murderers.
"It's not like in the movies," police Sgt. David White says, describing his encounter with a gun-wielding suspect that was captured on his body camera. The video is among those featured on this series, which offers unprecedented access to police units that are using this innovative and vital technology in the line of duty. The series takes viewers on the "ultimate ride-along" as they view the life-or-death, split-second decisions that those in law enforcement are forced to make on a daily basis. Each story weaves interviews with responding officers throughout to provide critical context to their decisions and to add additional insight to the life-changing, sometimes tragically fatal, moments.
The most terrifying criminals often hide in plain sight, looking as ordinary as a friendly next-door neighbor. Those regular Joes are the focus of "American Monster," precisely because lurking within them are psychopathic killers. Similar to Investigation Discovery's "See No Evil," the hourlong series uses personal movie footage of the monsters-in-disguise at home with family and friends, giving viewers a sense of how their lives are seemingly normal. Interweaved are the stories of their astonishing crimes and interviews with neighbors and loved ones.
In this eight-episode series, viewers hear directly from detectives who investigated cases that haunt them to this day. These true-crime stories -- from mysterious vanishings to twisted family murders -- are the "unforgettable cases that disrupt law and order, and keep authorities up at night," says Investigation Discovery.
The South can be as shadowy as the muddy waters that run through it, especially when it comes to crime; an exploration of the duplicitous characters, unique settings and boundless mysteries of the American South.
Using dramatic re-enactments bolstered by police reports and forensic evidence, Investigation Discovery delves into the minds of female killers in "Deadly Women." Each episode focuses on four different cases in which women, for a variety of reasons and with a variety of methods, chose to take the lives of others. Stories featured include more recent cases, like that of Andrea Yates, the Texas woman who in 2001 drowned her five children one by one in the bathtub and then called police, to older cases like that of the "baby farmer" Sarah Makin in 1890s Australia, who killed illegitimate infants left temporarily in her care.
Neighbors turn against each other with frightful consequences.
Like trying to decipher the value of a book without ever opening it, judging a person by his or her outward appearance can be a mistake. Someone may look perfect on the outside, but even the most kind-hearted soul has a dark side looming. "Diabolical" is a 10-episode docuseries that delves into the minds of murderers, asking a simple question: "Why did they do it?" The acts were committed with extreme premeditation -- many were months or even years in the making. Tension builds in each episode as law enforcement taps into the methods of devious masterminds, aided by insights from forensic psychologists and psychiatrists as well as criminal profilers.
With one quick click the internet allows people to share information like family photos and professional accomplishments, making it easy to ignore or forget that behind clever screen names and witty captions is a dark digital world with real dangers and risks. In hour-long episodes, "Web of Lies" unravels tragic stories of deception and manipulation triggered by online interactions, from predators lurking behind Facebook profiles to creeps scouring chat rooms for their victims. Re-enactments are buttressed by comments from law enforcement personnel, true-crime experts and psychologists, plus first-person accounts from friends and families of the victims.
In classic Investigation Discovery style, "Murder in the Heartland" weaves harrowing narratives of quiet Middle America towns torn apart by provocative crimes. Each town's tale is given life by the combined perspectives of its residents, who are more than just storytellers. The interviewees were also key witnesses to each of the crimes, and they hold critical clues to puzzles that not only have forever changed their lives but how they have come to view their once-idyllic hometowns.
How well do you know your neighbors? What are their names? What do they do for a living? After watching "Nightmare Next Door," you may want to find out a little more about them. Each episode tells the story of a murder that happened in a seemingly tight-knit community. Viewers get to the heart of the case through interviews with investigators, prosecutors, family members and -- of course -- neighbors, in addition to forensic experiments. The stories reveal twists and turns, and when a suspect emerges, the final outcome can surprise everyone involved.
Dark dreams see the light of day in "Your Worst Nightmare," a typical Investigation Discovery true-crime series complete with jump-out-of-your-seat moments and chilling conclusions. Classic suspense film techniques highlight re-enactments of creepy, harrowing crimes, as victims' darkest dreams become unfathomable realities. Each hourlong episode features one story interlaced with commentary from law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, and psychologists, plus accounts from friends and family of the victim.
Stories of the survivors who were kidnapped and lived.
Chilling scenarios unfold in this true-crime series, which tells actual stories of people who shared their lives with loved ones who became killers. Each hourlong episode puts viewers in the shoes of the loved one, who first notices that something is amiss, interprets the puzzling signs and clues, and eventually comes face-to-face with the horrible truth: that the person has a very dark side. Exclusive interviews and firsthand accounts of the critical moments leading up to the vicious acts showcase devastating, often undiscussed consequences on the people who have nurtured, loved and raised a murderer.
Using stylized re-enactments to tell actual stories, "Forbidden: Dying for Love" delves into relationships that defy traditions, break taboos, and lead to heinous crimes. These star-crossed lovers -- from the couple who discard religious customs for love to the pastor who falls for the co-worker-- have tried to resist the forces that threaten to keep them apart. However, as Investigation Discovery says, "once they've crossed the line, anything becomes possible."
Powerfully emotional stories tell of people who have been targets of compulsive stalkers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 6 million people in the U.S. are stalked each year, and in most instances, the stalker is someone the victim already knows. The series' hourlong episodes dramatize actual cases through visceral re-enactments and pointed testimony of victims, family members and law enforcement authorities, revealing what happens when stalkers can't have what -- or who -- they want, and stop at nothing to ensure that no one else can either. The chilling accounts probe the mechanics of an obsessive mind and the devastating impact of delusion.
When a crime scene throws suspicion in multiple directions, investigators may have a perfect murder on their hands. Ingenious killers are every detective's worst nightmare, as the crimes they commit are full of leads that become dead ends, and multiple suspects are ultimately discarded. But just when a murderer thinks he or she has successfully gotten away with it, one small clue leads to another and a cold case suddenly turns hot. "The Perfect Murder" follows actual cases and uses stylized re-enactments depicting detectives slowly putting the pieces together to complete intricate puzzles.
Investigation Discovery and People magazine partner to re-examine some of the most high profile crime cases in recent history. The one-hour series brings viewers tales of betrayal, buried secrets and unsung heroes, ripped from the pages of one of the nation's top weekly magazines. These stories transcended news and became part of pop culture, revealing shocking twists, new evidence, and unexpected resolutions. Interlaced within every episode are exclusive interviews with People's journalists, archival footage, re-creations, and firsthand accounts by those closest to the investigations.
Reexaminations of cases in which unanswered questions still remain; includes interviews with law enforcement personnel, family members and private investigators as well as news footage and social media posts.
From blushing brides turned cold-blooded killers to smitten grooms with shocking dark sides, "Fatal Vows" examines the criminal psychology behind deadly divorces. Guiding viewers through actual stories of love gone wrong are psychotherapist Stacy Kaiser and forensic/clinical psychologist Dr. Brian Russell, who examine each couple to better understand how the marriage turned from flawed to fatal. Stylized re-enactments are supported by interviews with family, friends, law enforcement, and potential victims of the crime, while Kaiser and Dr. Russell provide analysis on unions that break down until divorce and murder collide.