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In the heart of Texas, everything's bigger at Ekstensive Metal Works, where owner/mastermind Bill Carlton and his creative team design and build outrageous, enviable cars and trucks. Turning the ordinary into the extraordinary means Bill, a third-generation welder, uses everything from rusted wrecks to top-of-the-line vehicles including a 1955 Chevy truck, a 2014 Porsche 911, a 1967 Lincoln Continental, a 1966 Chevrolet C10, and a 1961 Cadillac DeVille. Whether it's tricked-out trucks with wild hydraulics or facelifts for classic muscle cars, Ekstensive cranks out detailed, full-service work for clients from around the country.

Latest episodes

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Hall of Fame running back Earl Campbell arrives with the body and parts of a 1949 Cadillac, and the crew is honored to create a ground-up build for the local legend; a 1940 F-100 build snowballs into a much bigger job.
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Ekstensive's built a lot of trucks, but never a Ford Bronco until now; Bill and the guys transform a rusted '68 Bronco roadster into a high-powered off-roading truck with a supercharged engine, handmade dash, roll cage, and waterproof interior.
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This year's over-the-top build has Bill and crew lifting a 2020 Chevy Silverado 5500 more than a foot with a custom heavy-duty air suspension; the guys also prove their Texas mettle by radically overhauling the utility bed.
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A 1996 dump truck is the largest truck the shop has ever customized; the guys go extra heavy duty to create a military-styled megatruck; a lowrider enthusiast wants a custom air ride and LS swap for his pristine 1934 Buick.
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A 1937 International Harvester gets a big old Cummins 12-valve diesel engine that's as heavy as the truck itself; a 2005 Chevy Colorado gets a new lease on life as a nitrous-infused drag truck.
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Bill and the team get their chance to finish a 1968 Chevy C10, which they turn into a unibody by welding the body and bed into one piece; an old dump truck rolls into the shop as the biggest truck the team has ever customized.
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Bill looks to the year 2073 when the owner of a '73 El Camino challenges the shop to transform his vehicle into the Ride of the Future; the city wants a custom bumper on a 2020 Freightliner tow truck.
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Bill knows all too well that families are the lifeblood of the custom truck scene. A customer wants to transform a 1965 Ford Falcon Club Wagon into a fully custom family cruiser. A 1966 Cobra replica gets reinforced.
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Bill and the team fix another shop's mistakes when a 2017 F-350 is hauled into the shop broken due to a botched lift; a client insists on the ultimate tailgating BBQ trailer with custom everything.
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The team goes bigger on the yearlong 1950 Ford F5 COE build when the client asks for a last-minute Cummins diesel engine swap; a twisted graphic wraps up a months-long 2001 Ford F350.
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Bill and the team try to outdo themselves with a radical redesign of 1950 Ford F5 COE, starting with a bed unlike any they've built; the shop begins its first shot at remaking a '69 Corvette Stingray.
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Bill and the guys are known for their custom metal work, but the transformation of a 1940 International Harvester water truck into a mobile barbecue pit tests all their skills; a 1986 C-10 is a family heirloom that's remade for future generations.
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Bill and the team bring a wrecked '70 Suburban hauler back to life as a long bed, four door, crew cab dually with a 5.9 Cummins diesel engine, custom chassis and suspension; a '65 Plymouth Belvedere II gets some extra muscle with a Mopar crate Hemi.
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Bill pushes the shop's creativity with his own build of a 2018 Yukon Denali XL; the luxury SUV is their tallest build ever with a custom lift, straight axles and a supercharger; the '70 Suburban gets a custom chassis and body with a fourth door.
VOD available
The wrecked shell of a 1970 Suburban car hauler tests Bill and his metal geniuses as they transform it into a high-end diesel, low, long bed, crew cab dually; Ekstensive makes a lifted and loaded F150 for Boots for Troops, a military charity.
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Bill and the guys take a good C10 to a hundred with custom touches from inside to out including one of one interior and bed; Ekstensive makes a dream come true by modifying a 2018 Dodge Demon for an under ten second quarter mile run on the track.
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Rusty and riddled with bullet holes, Bill's neighbor hands over the crumbling shell of a '52 Ford F4 Milk Truck; the guys unleash their best fabrication skills and turn this 60-year-old milk truck into a one of a kind, dazzling diesel street rod.
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Bill and the gang are back under the hood of the 2018 Camaro ZL1, rebuilding the engine to add as much power as possible before a visit to the dynamometer; Ekstensive tries to turn a patinaed 1949 GMC pickup sleeper truck into keeper truck.
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The 2018 Camaro ZL1 is already a high performance sports car, but the owner wants Bill to improve his even more; the guys are happy to oblige, starting with a handmade aluminum chassis and interior; a new client wants his Sierra Denali frame dropped.
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A client wants Bill to set the bar for custom SUVs with a 2018 Yukon Denali; the guys get busy with chassis, body mods, interior and twin turbos; Ekstensive goes full gangster with a 1948 Mercury, remaking a legendary car from the inside out.
VOD available
Bill and the guys customize a new 2017 Ford F350, lowering it with their handmade air ride and adding a one-of-a-kind gooseneck hitch; the owner of a 2014 Porsche 911 wants her sports car to sound as good as it looks.

Similar on YouTube TV

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When Burt Reynolds raced a Trans Am across the country in the 1977 movie "Smokey and the Bandit," a new generation of American muscle car lovers was born. The Trans Am rode a wave of popularity for years before fading into extinction. Now, entrepreneurial brothers Scott and Tad Warmack want to resurrect America's most recognizable muscle car, and they risked everything to acquire its rights. This series follows the Warmacks and their team of car savants as they re-engineer and meticulously craft the classic cars. They build new ones from existing bodies and use big, powerful engines and modern equipment to satisfy auto aficionados.
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They may think their classic cars are priceless, but owners get a true sense of what their rides are worth in this series. TV personality and self-professed big-time "car dork" Dennis Pittsenbarger hosts, joined by a team of professional appraisers including Randy Carlson, Addison Brown, Nick Smith and Todd Wertman, who provide the critical, expert eyes auto enthusiasts need to properly determine value. Whether it's a clunker or a classic, what it's worth may be shocking. The series also unveils the history and memories of the unique rides, as each car has its own story, from cross-country vacations to circling Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Various networks
In rural Canning, Nova Scotia, sits a modest auto body shop whose proprietor has built a legendary reputation. He's known in town as a custom car artist "who can build a Bugatti out of a chicken coop," a neighbor says. Now, Chad Hiltz, aka "Bad Chad," is ready to expand his horizons, helped in no small part by this series that airs across North America. It shows how Hiltz incorporates literally anything into his car builds -- parts from boats, airplanes, even old lockers -- and uses basic tools and lots of ingenuity. Isolated and cash poor, Chad's creations spring from a mind that never stops. If he can imagine it, he will find a way to build it. The series also features, among others, Chad's shop manager and fiancee, Jolene, and son Colton.
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Master metal fabricator Joe Martin showcased his motorcycle-building skills by winning a world championship on Discovery's "Biker Build-Off" competition. On "Iron Resurrection," Martin tackles projects mounted on two and four wheels at his custom shop near Austin, Texas. Joe's wife, Amanda, and his best friend, Jayson "Shag" Arrington, scour the Texas countryside for busted bikes and rusted roadsters, then Joe and his crew work metal magic to turn the unpolished gems into shiny, hot rod reality. In the end Shag negotiates with a buyer to get the highest price for the Martin Bros Customs creation. "Refueled" offers scenes not shown on original "Iron Resurrection" episodes.
Various networks
At Classic Car Studio, an A to Z automotive shop in St. Louis, owner Noah Alexander and his team specialize in full restorations and custom builds for clients who want their rides fast and furious. "Speed Is the New Black" takes viewers inside the facility to see how beloved cars like a 1962 Corvette, a 1990 Porsche 911 and a 1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1 -- and everything in between -- are revived for the open road. Spurred by Noah's intricate creative vision and wholesome Midwestern personality, Classic Car Studio willingly takes on any daunting task to deliver custom pieces of auto art.
Various networks
After departing Gas Monkey Garage in 2016, former "Fast N' Loud" star Aaron Kaufman opened his own auto shop, Arclight Fabrication, in Dallas, where he's shifting gears by focusing on his personal car-design passions. Along with a crew of hand-picked builders from around the country, Aaron pushes his design abilities by working on different types of vehicles. His goal for every build: maximize performance, then test each car in some of the harshest conditions known to the auto world. The series documents the guys' excitement and curiosity for how far their talents will take them, as they their build expertise, stamina and creativity to the test.
Various networks
Located on the outskirts of Las Vegas, Steve Darnell and his band of oddballs and misfits create one-of-a-kind, Mad Max-style rat rods. With the demands of their quirky customers, the team at Welder Up strips and rebuilds vehicles from hidden treasure. In each episode, the automotive fabricators use their imaginations and creativity to create a unique vehicle for each unique owner. With details ranging from a shotgun gearshift to horseshoe gas pedals, the crew transforms discarded treasure and performance parts into bizarre, eccentric and truly one-of-a-kind rolling works of art.
Various networks
For more than 20 years, building award-winning custom cars and trucks has been the lifeblood of father-son duo Doug and Brad DeBerti. Now they hope their creativity in the garage helps Brad get on the track and turn his dream of becoming a full-time professional racer into reality. For that to happen, the DeBertis must push the boundaries on each custom build to create innovative, state-of-the-art vehicles and fund Brad's racing career. "Twin Turbos" follows their quest, which is supported by NASCAR star and Daytona 500 champion Joey Logano, who appears in the series as a mentor to Brad.
Various networks
Car builder Nate Boyer wants to expand his thriving restoration/modification business, but is he barking up the wrong tree by opening "The Doghouse"? The new venture, as detailed in the reality series "Gear Dogs," brings together auto mechanics and hobbyists who are willing to test their skills customizing rides like a '67 Plymouth Belvedere, 1980 Jeep Honcho, and a 1956 Chevy Nomad. The candidates, aka "Dogs," use Nate's space, equipment and know-how in exchange for him receiving a cut of the profits after the finished cars are sold. Beyond Nate taking a chance with unfamiliar personnel, can he balance two shops and turn the Doghouse into a success?
Various networks
"It's Mopar or No Car" for Mark Worman and his Graveyard Carz ghouls. They're game for any repair or restoration job, as long as it's in the Mopar mold -- a Chrysler muscle car from the late 1960s or early '70s. The series follows the progress to get the racing classics -- some left for dead in a scrap heap -- across the proverbial finish line, which to muscle car specialist Worman means nothing less than perfect restorations. After all, too much beauty exists in quality Detroit automobiles to let them go to rust.