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Kentucky Justice

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Harlan County, Ky., has a history of violence and corruption associated with coal mining, but because that industry in Appalachia is a shell of its former self, law enforcement is dedicating its resources elsewhere. The county has been hit hard by a new kind of crime -- prescription drug dealing -- and it's up to Sheriff Marvin J. Lipfird to get it under control. In the reality-documentary series "Kentucky Justice," Lipfird and his team of deputies target everyone from street-corner dealers to city officials in a quest to clean up communities.

Latest episodes

aired 4 days ago
DUI suspect has heart attack symptoms that might be related to using bath salt-laced cocaine.
aired 4 days ago
Town Sheriff Marvin J. Lipfird and his dedicated team bring down dealers and make the county of Harlan, Ky., a safer place.
aired 11 days ago
When a serial arsonist is on the loose, Sheriff Marvin J. Lipfird follows every lead possible.
aired 11 days ago
Sheriff Lipfird and his deputies are on high alert for illegal marijuana growers.
aired 11 days ago
Sheriff Marvin J. Lipfird investigates arson in his old neighborhood; rookie deputy goes on a wild goose chase.

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