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Jack Hanna's Animal Adventures

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One of America's most-beloved naturalists and adventurers, Jack takes millions of family viewers on exciting journeys each week to learn about animals and the places they inhabit.

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Longtime zookeeper Jack Hanna hosts this Emmy-winning show that takes viewers on a journey around the world to showcase animals in their natural habitats. In addition to showing footage of the creatures and giving information about the places where they live, "Into the Wild" discusses the protection and conservation of endangered species. Among the locations visited are remote jungles, deserts, oceans and forests.
Kids love animals, and there's no better way to learn about these many colorful creatures than by getting up close and personal with them. Zoologist Jarod Miller does just that in this children's show featuring all manner of friendly and not-so-friendly critters. The youthful host and his zookeeper friends hand-feed crocodiles, dangle sticks in front of snapping turtles, handle venomous snakes, and enter a shark cage for a meet-and-greet with the fearsome fishes. While the proceedings sound positively wild, the show features an equal amount of milder animal interaction and loads of kid-friendly humor, such as kissing monkeys and punching kangaroos.
Jack Hanna has hosted TV shows about wildlife since the premiere of "Jack Hanna's Animal Adventures" in 1993 and has become a zoological authority in his 30-plus years working at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Ohio. On "Wild Countdown," he uses his knowledge and experience to present count-down lists of rare, fascinating creatures -- appropriate, given Hanna's many appearances on "Late Show With David Letterman." Topics include beasts equipped with armor, deceptively cute -- but dangerous -- animals, and adorable baby critters.
This educational series takes viewers on a journey around the world to meet all kinds of animals, from the familiar to the not-so-familiar. "Animal Atlas" teaches viewers about the animals' lives, histories and adaptations that allow them to survive in their environment. Whether it's visiting monkeys or heading underwater for a look at mammals that live in the ocean, "Animal Atlas" brings animals from around the globe into viewers' homes for an up-close look at how the animals live.
Mariette Hartley is an Emmy-winning actress who is also passionate about fighting for animals' rights so, naturally, she hosts this series that aims to educate young people about animals. Each episode features four stories about exotic and unique animals to help kids and teenagers learn about the animal kingdom. Whether it's a story about ocean creatures or critters that can be found in one's backyard, "Wild About Animals" aims to educate and entertain kids through a combination of dramatic footage and an engaging narrative.
"The Wildlife Docs" takes viewers inside the work of zoological professionals -- including veterinarians, technicians and trainers -- at Busch Gardens Tampa, as they care for thousands of exotic animals whose home is the popular tourist destination. The series showcases everything from preventive care to ground-breaking medical procedures, giving viewers the opportunity to observe what the millions of people who visit Bush Gardens each year rarely get to see. The hostess of the weekly half-hour series is actress Rachel Reenstra.
This popular PBS program may find a wider audience with this syndicated version, a documentary of producer and narrator Marty Stouffer's many encounters over the years with virtually every mammal, bird, fish and reptile in the North American wilderness.
"Move as millions. Survive as one." That's the catchphrase of this seven-part event for which a National Geographic team spent two-plus years recording across 20 countries and all seven continents. Narrated by Alec Baldwin, it tells the stories of many of the planet's species and the journeys they undertake to ensure their survival. The diverse range of animals shown -- many revealing behaviors never caught on film before -- include Botswana zebras, Mali elephants, flying foxes in Australia, Pacific white sharks, and the white-eared kob of the Sudan, thought to have been destroyed during decades of violence.