Watch on YouTube TV

Good Eats

Watch live TV from 70+ networks
Free unlimited cloud DVR storage space
6 accounts per household included
$49.99/month.
Cancel anytime.
Equal parts smart and sardonic, creator and host Alton Brown uses a combination of classroom methods and wacky comedy sketches to explain not just how to whip up an excellent dish, but also why the ingredients interact as they do when you put them all together. Brown has said that the show's inspiration is to combine Julia Child, Mr. Wizard and "Monty Python."

Latest episodes

VOD available
First the pandemic, then the zombies, then the nukes and now: desolation and a giant dinosaur-thing. Luckily there are still plenty of yeast in the air, and Alton Brown proves that with a wild sourdough in the kitchen, the post-apocalyptic world can still taste good -- and he makes cheese crackers and waffles to prove it.
VOD available
Alton Brown discusses how to get dates into culinary life, including three recipes for the 1960s classic Devils on Horseback and a very sticky toffee pudding.
VOD available
Alton Brown journeys through the history and science of popular raw-meat dish steak tartare.
VOD available
One of America's most storied sandwiches gets a historic rethink and a technical do-over, from the oysters to the bread and everything in between.
VOD available
Alton Brown resuscitates the languishing tradition of the icebox or refrigerator cake, these no-bake cakes were all the rage in the 1950s, but they're ready for a pastry redux.
VOD available
Alton Brown takes a deep dive on one of the most internet-famous dishes of the decade by way of a famous film from the 1940s; along the way, Alton talks through preserved lemons and homemade harissa.
VOD available
The last decade has seen a lot of change in the food world, but no device has made more of a difference than the immersion circulator; Alton Brown makes an argument for having one in every kitchen by featuring some dishes.
VOD available
Alton Brown has the sauces that will save the seafood dishes.
VOD available
Alton Brown makes the argument that Italian food was actually invented in America and that Chicken Parmesan is the dish where it all began.
VOD available
Ancient American grains like amaranth, chia and quinoa are making a comeback due to their versatility and nutritional content and Alton Brown shows how to make the most of these very old kitchen newcomers.
VOD available
Asian noodles; "ants climbing trees."
VOD available
The odd ball of the cabbage family: cauliflower.
VOD available
The power of yeast in classic rolls.
VOD available
A definitive bread pudding using a scientific secret formula.
VOD available
With decent fish and the mastering of a few basics, Bouillabaisse can qualify as one of the true "good eats."
VOD available
Lasagna, the most comforting ingredient of all time.
VOD available
Three ways to make chicken pot pie.
VOD available
Devil's food cake's ingredient cocoa powder.
VOD available
Hummus and falafel made from dry chickpeas.
VOD available
Three classic meringue desserts; baked Alaska.
VOD available
Alton Brown goes back to the fall classics at Plymouth and uses them today.

Similar on YouTube TV

Various networks
Four chefs call on their culinary skills as they face off against one another to prepare a spectacular three-course meal consisting of an appetizer, entree and dessert. The catch? In each round, they have to use all the ingredients the show provides them, however unlikely they might be (Gummi Bears, anyone?). At the end of each course, a panel of three guest judges "chops" one chef who fails to measure up in terms of taste, presentation and creativity. The last chef standing takes home bragging rights and a cool $10,000. Ted Allen hosts.
Various networks
Cook, author and talk show host Rachael Ray is a busy woman, but that doesn't mean there's no time to prepare great food. In this long-running series Ray demonstrates how to make a complete three-course meal in under 30 minutes, from comfort food to sophisticated fare for entertaining.
Various networks
"Cutthroat Kitchen" isn't a typical cooking competition. A player, in addition to being a good chef, must be able to outwit and, at times, sabotage opponents to win. Each episode features four people vying in three rounds to win up to $25,000 cash. At the beginning, $100,000 is split evenly among the players to spend however they wish during the game. The chefs spend the money at auctions to get things that could help them -- like buying exclusive use of salt -- or hinder their opponents -- like prohibiting them from tasting a recipe in progress. Each round eliminates one chef, until there is a winner. Although the competitors want to make purchases at auction to improve the chances of winning, they don't want to spend too much; the amount remaining in the winner's bank determines the ultimate prize. Some special tournaments -- usually seasonally themed -- stretch across multiple episodes and offer higher amounts of money. Alton Brown hosts.
Various networks
Hosted by cookbook author Ina Garten, "Barefoot Contessa" is all about simple, fun entertaining. The former White House nuclear policy analyst (for President Richard Nixon) shares recipes for picnics, parties and dinners as well as other touches to make a meal or event a success.
Various networks
Competition to become the host of a cooking show.
Various networks
Coming up with ideas for dishes using the mystery ingredients provided on "Chopped" can be difficult for adult chefs with years of experience, so imagine how difficult it is for young chefs on "Chopped Junior." In this version of the long-running franchise, children are tasked with making something out of mystery-basket ingredients that don't seem to go together. The usual "Chopped" judges are joined by celebrity guest judges to determine which kids advance after each round. The winning cook earns the same $10,000 prize that adults win on the main show. If things get a little too intense for the youngsters, host Ted Allen is there to comfort them and encourage them to keep going.