Watch on YouTube TV

TLC

Watch live TV from 60+ networks
Free unlimited cloud DVR storage space
6 accounts per household included
$49.99/month.
Cancel anytime.

Featured shows

The rarely seen world of a polygamist family is documented in "Sister Wives," which follows Kody Brown, his four wives and their combined 18 children trying to live as a "normal" family in a society that shuns their lifestyle. Three of the wives -- Meri, Janelle and Christine -- have worked for years with Kody to develop a cohesive, loving unit, and their marriages produced 13 kids. Then wife No. 4, Robyn, and her three children were added to the family much later, a development that produced mixed feelings, insecurities and uncertainties. Will it disrupt the balance and change the Browns' lives for the worse?
Matt and Amy Roloff, both 4 feet tall, face a variety of challenges in raising their four children: twins Jeremy and Zach, who is 2-feet shorter than his brother, and younger siblings Molly and Jacob, who like Jeremy are average height. The family's 34-acre Oregon farm serves as part playground and part moneymaker. As the series ages, Matt and Amy deal with personal strife, embrace their kids getting older and leading lives of their own, become grandparents, and attempt to keep Roloff Farms operational.
Two sets of neighbors, 48 hours, $1,000. Neighbors swap houses, and with the help of a designer and carpenter, transform a room in two days. The best, and worst, part about it is that the homeowner has zero say in what gets done. In later seasons the budgets increased and each team was given more time to complete the makeovers.
As a regular guest on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" as well as the host of his own syndicated talker, interior designer Nate Berkus used charm, good looks and professional know-how to establish a solid rapport with viewers. Now he's back on TV, this time in a venture that co-stars his husband -- fellow designer Jeremiah Brent -- and their baby daughter, Poppy. Hourlong episodes follow the couple at work as they rescue homeowners who are trapped in nightmare renovation projects and cannot see an end in sight. Using unique design pieces to add character and a personal touch, Nate and Jeremiah transform each home's layout into a practical yet stylish space. However, the most important job they face is to raise Poppy. The proud parents bring the audience inside their private lives to see how they spend time with "the girl that changed everything."
The Johnstons -- all seven -- of Forsyth, Ga., are the subjects of this reality-documentary series. The brood, TLC says, are "the world's largest known family of achondroplasia dwarfs." Achondroplasia is a genetic disorder of bone growth, but the series demonstrates that size only matters in the amount of love the Johnstons provide. Trent, a grounds supervisor at a local college, and housewife Amber have two biological children -- Jonah and Elizabeth -- while Anna, Alex and Emma were adopted from Russia, Korea and China, respectively. Episodes deal with everything from high-drama soccer tryouts to a disastrous attempt at a "birds and bees" discussion, all framed by the family tackling a massive renovation of their 6,000-square-foot, circa 1891 home.
Her actual name is Sandra Lee, but she is so popular in her field of dermatology that she is known by most people as Dr. Pimple Popper. In 2015, Dr. Lee began to provide a window into her job by filming dermatological procedures -- some quite gruesome, like blackhead extractions and cyst dissections -- and posting them to her website and across other social media outlets. Lo and behold, the content has been viewed by millions of people, who now have their own designation -- Popaholics. Now comes a reality show on TLC, which says Lee is a "celebrity who has pioneered the fastest growing medical fascination in decades."
Long-distance relationships have challenges that are sometimes difficult to overcome but consider if the distance traveled was halfway around the world and a couple had just 90 days to decide whether the courtship should conclude with marriage. That's the situation facing the men and women profiled in this series, which shares the complexities of international romances. Using a visa that allows foreign fiancees of American citizens to travel to the U.S., the men and women experience life in the States with their prospective mates for the first time. Culture and language barriers must be overcome -- not to mention the stigma of being thought of as mail-order spouses -- but here's the elephant in the room: The couples must marry before the visas expire in 90 days, or else the visitors have to immediately return to their countries. With the clock ticking, these couples discover if their "happily ever after" is meant to be.
Telling powerful stories in hourlong episodes, TLC follows medical journeys of morbidly obese people as they attempt to save their own lives. The featured individuals -- each weighing more than 600 pounds -- confront lifelong emotional and physical struggles as they make the courageous decision to undergo high-risk gastric bypass surgery. In addition to drastically changing their appearances, they hope to reclaim their independence, mend relationships with friends and family, and renew their feelings of self-worth.
Inside Kleinfeld Bridal, the Manhattan-based bridal salon that is arguably the world's finest. More than 250 professionals, most of them veterans from the shop's early days in Brooklyn, bend over backward to make each bride's experience unforgettable. Part bridal story, part fashion makeover and part family therapy session, each "Say Yes to the Dress" episode looks at the personalities and craftsmanship that come into play as the Kleinfeld staff goes to sometimes extreme lengths to realize each bride's dreams.
Marrying someone you have known for no more than 90 days comes with more risks than traditional unions. This companion series to "90 Day Fiance" sets out to see how the relationship has worked out for several couples from the original show. The show reveals what has gone on in the lives of the returning couples, whom TLC calls "the most memorable from previous seasons," since they tied the knot. Among the issues the couples have faced are criticism from their loved ones and on social media, potentially having to move away from their hometowns, and pregnancy struggles.
Following the couples that didn't appear after saying "I do."
Lisa Kudrow ("Friends") serves as executive producer for this Emmy nominated series, based on a popular show in the U.K., in which viewers get a look at the family histories of popular celebrities. Kudrow, Matthew Broderick, Spike Lee, Sarah Jessica Parker, Susan Sarandon, Brooke Shields and Emmitt Smith are among the well-known personalities whose genealogies are explored.
Designers, carpenters and landscapers are brought into an unsuspecting homeowner's house while they're "out" to redecorate and reinvent all sorts of living spaces. There's an accomplice that keeps the other guest out of the house while the work is done and finds out all sorts of information to be used later in a prize trivia segment where they have the chance to win extra luxuries for their new space.
The sextuplets and twins are growing, and so is Kate Gosselin. This series of specials showcases new adventures for the spotlight-loving mom and her eight kids, as she adjusts to being single and taking on a more exclusive role in the lives of her five girls and three boys.
"My Big Fat Fabulous Life" follows Whitney Thore's emotional journey after being diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome. The disorder caused Whitney, a slender dancer at the time, to gain more than 200 pounds in one year at college. Feeling trapped in a big body, she struggled with self-doubt and negative stereotypes. Now 380 pounds and eager to continue sharing her passion for dance, Whitney has learned to embrace her body and love herself again. She teaches dance classes for plus-size girls, explores the dating scene, confronts bullies, and wears a bikini on the beach for the first time in 10 years. She also spearheads a campaign that fights body-shaming and promotes self-love and acceptance. To that end, Whitney Thore is no longer letting her fear of people's judgment dictate the way she lives her life.
TLC revamps the home design series that originally aired on the network from 2002 to 2006. Hosted by Ananda Lewis, "While You Were Out" now features an all-star cast of designers from both TLC and HGTV, including Carter Oosterhouse, Sabrina Soto, Ty Pennington, Vern Yip, Hilary Farr, Nicole Curtis and Vanilla Ice. Given a $10,000 budget, each set of designers and carpenters design one room in neighboring houses after the homeowner sends their significant other on a weekend getaway. The ultimate surprise reveal culminates each episode upon their return. One home includes TLC designers and the other, HGTV designers.
Capitalizing on the success of its hit series "Sister Wives," TLC focuses on the journeys of three unique families in various phases of polygamous relationships. Cameras capture the intimate process of men seeking, dating or incorporating a new wife into their family structure and the myriad triumphs, frustrations and heartaches associated with the emotional changes. Of course, with multiple husbands, wives and 20-plus children residing between the households, drama-filled days are inevitable. But these families are determined to open their hearts and homes to new wives, even if a few growing pains are felt along the way.
This prequel to TLC's "90 Day Fiancé" -- the series about couples who unite in America under a special U.S. visa -- tells of how the couples first became acquainted. From the initial in-person meeting to traveling to a faraway country, the stories of these potential spouses-to-be uncover hidden truths, navigate cultural differences and ultimately determine if online romance can lead to true love. The participants overcome various challenges to meet the person they believe is their soul mate, including 20-year age gaps, language barriers, and precarious boat rides down the Amazon River.
In the latest installment in the Duggar franchise, the network focuses on the family's older children as they celebrate some of life's milestone moments, including big moves, the realities of growing up, and raising their own families. "19 Kids and Counting" spinoff "Counting On" (formerly "Jill & Jessa: Counting On") tracks Jessa and husband Ben adjusting to life with infant son Spurgeon, while Jill and husband Derick continue their missionary work with baby boy Israel in Central America. Back in Arkansas, siblings Jana, Jinger, Joy Anna, John David, Josiah and Joseph explore their own talents and passions.
When Jazz Jennings was 2 years old, she asked her mother when a fairy was going to change her from a boy to a girl. Now years removed from the beginning of her transition, Jazz is a transgender young woman with a unique perspective and some unexpected daily experiences. Those are shared in this complex and fascinating docuseries, which focuses on Jazz as she prepares to enter high school, faces decisions regarding her health, has to choose between her passion for soccer and spending more time with friends, and enters the dating world. Parents Greg and Jeanette -- who have always supported Jazz -- now worry about what's next as she enters adolescence. Sister Ari and twin brothers Griffen and Sander stand by their little sister and guide her as she begins her high school years.
Long-distance relationships have challenges that are sometimes difficult to overcome but consider if the distance traveled was halfway around the world and a couple had just 90 days to decide whether the courtship should conclude with marriage. That's the situation facing the men and women profiled in this series, which includes bonus footage not seen in episodes of "90 Day Fiancé." Using a visa that allows foreign sweethearts of American citizens to travel to the U.S., the men and women experience life in the States with their prospective mates for the first time. Culture and language barriers must be overcome -- not to mention the stigma of being thought of as mail-order spouses -- but here's the elephant in the room: The couples must marry before the visas expire in 90 days, or else the visitors have to immediately return to their countries. With the clock ticking, these couples discover if their "happily ever after" is meant to be.