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"There is nothing wrong with your television set." That famous line opens each episode of the classic science fiction anthology series as part of a narration that makes people think their TVs are being controlled. Episodes of the series, which numbered 49 over the course of two seasons, range from a mix of sci-fi and horror that feature "scary monster" motifs to episodes focused on the sci-fi aspects of the stories. Episode writers include such notables as series creator Leslie Stevens and Harlan Ellison.

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This 1980s revival of the classic sci-fi series features a similar style to the original anthology series. Each episode tells a tale (sometimes two or three) rooted in horror or suspense, often with a surprising twist at the end. Episodes usually feature elements of drama and comedy. Actor Charles Aidman serves as the show's narrator for the first two seasons before being replaced by TV host Robin Ward for the final season. Some episodes are adaptations of stories by well-known writers, including Harlan Ellison, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen King; other episodes are remakes of installments from the original series.
Hourlong horror films from famous directors are showcased in this anthology series, with works by Dario Argento, John Carpenter, Larry Cohen, Don Coscarelli, Joe Dante, Mick Garris, Stuart Gordon, Tobe Hooper, John Landis, William Malone, Lucky McKee, John McNaughton and Takashi Miike.
The iconic series "Star Trek" follows the crew of the starship USS Enterprise as it completes its missions in space in the 23rd century. Captain James T. Kirk -- along with half- human/half-Vulcan science officer Spock, ship Dr. "Bones" McCoy, Ensign Pavel Chekov, communications officer Lt. Nyota Uhura, helmsman Lt. Hikaru Sulu and chief engineer Lt. Cmdr. Montgomery "Scotty" Scott -- confront strange alien races, friendly and hostile alike, as they explore unknown worlds.
The familiar "plink, plink" of the theme song, accompanied by the line drawing of a man in profile immediately identifies the show as "Alfred Hitchcock Presents." The famed director opens almost every episode with the words "Good evening ..." After a joke -- usually about the evening's sponsor -- Hitchcock lays the groundwork for that episode's freestanding story of suspense and terror.