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Filmed on location in New York, the drama showcases the sometimes-complex process of determining guilt or innocence, while lives hang in the balance. Often inspired by the latest headlines, the plots highlight legal, ethical or personal dilemmas to which people can relate.
Members of the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital care for the injured during the Korean War and use humor to escape from the horror and depression of the situation. Among the 4077's people are Capts. Benjamin "Hawkeye" Pierce and "Trapper John" McIntire, Majs. Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan and Frank Burns, and Cpl. Walter "Radar" O'Reilly.
Timed to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the 1978 Jonestown mass murder-suicide that killed more than 900 Americans, this four-part documentary tells of leader Jim Jones' transformation from charismatic preacher and civil rights advocate into narcissistic demagogue who championed the biggest mass suicide in U.S. history. This story is based on the best-selling book by investigative journalist Jeff Guinn and includes archival footage -- secret FBI and CIA recordings, unreleased photographs, personal letters and previously classified documents -- as well as new interviews with survivors and Jones family members who have not previously spoken on the record.
Mary Richards is a thirty-something single woman who settles in Minneapolis after breaking up with a boyfriend. She lands a job as an associate producer of the evening news at WJM-TV, which happens to be the area's lowest-rated station. Her boss, Lou Grant, hates her spunk but often looks to her to solve newsroom (or even personal) problems. Mary's other coworkers include news writer Murray Slaughter, egomaniacal anchorman Ted Baxter and "Happy Homemaker" Sue Ann Nivens (Betty White). Mary's home is a modest studio apartment -- and her upstairs neighbor, Rhoda Morgenstern, quickly becomes a good friend. Later in the series, Mary moves to a plush high-rise apartment before leaving Minneapolis and WJM for good.
"All in the Family" is touted as the series that brought reality to prime-time TV entertainment. The lead character, Archie Bunker, is a loudmouthed, uneducated bigot who believes in every stereotype he has ever heard. His wife, Edith, is sweet but not the sharpest knife in the drawer. They and their daughter, Gloria, and her husband, Mike, all live in a working-class home. Unfortunately for Archie, he can't avoid the people he disdains: His son-in-law -- whom Archie calls "Meathead" -- is an unemployed student and of Polish descent; the Jeffersons next door are black; Edith's cousin Maude is a feminist; and, later, his partners in a local tavern are Jewish.
The series focuses on life in Greenwich Village's 12th Precinct station house. Initially, it looks at Capt. Barney Miller and his work and home life, but it gradually becomes about the officers of the precinct, including always-on-the-verge-of-retirement Detective Fish.
Not to be confused with Newhart's eponymous 1961 variety show, "The Bob Newhart Show" finds the comic playing Bob Hartley, a Chicago psychologist living with wife Emily in a highrise. Bob is forced to deal with crazy patients, his wife and their friends.
Leaders, risk-takers, visionaries ... iconoclasts. The popular Sundance Channel series celebrates the extraordinary personalities in disciplines as varied as art, cinema, music, cuisine, sports, science, business and philanthropy, with each episode pairing two talents from entirely unlike worlds who shed a light on their unique experiences and inspirations. Featured twosomes have included Charlize Theron and Jane Goodall, Mario Batali and Michael Stipe, Brian Grazer and Sumner Redstone, Renee Zellweger and Christiane Amanpour, Paul Simon and Lorne Michaels, Dave Chappelle and Maya Angelou, Sean Penn and Jon Krakauer, Desmond Tutu and Richard Branson, and Venus Williams and Wyclef Jean.
In partnership with The Hollywood Reporter, SundanceTV presents round-table discussions with the stars, showrunners and producers of the year's most acclaimed series. Each hourlong episode features nominees in specific award categories, with the season's first half presenting leading Emmy contenders and other top stars, while the second half shows interviews with Oscar-nominated actors, directors, producers, and more. Stacey Wilson, special projects editor for The Hollywood Reporter, moderates discussions with panelists including Amy Schumer ("Inside Amy Schumer"), Lena Dunham ("Girls"), Lizzy Caplan ("Masters of Sex"), Taraji P. Henson ("Empire"), Timothy Hutton ("American Crime"), Jon Voight ("Ray Donovan"), Don Cheadle ("House of Lies") and Jordan Peele ("Key & Peele").
In a divided Germany in 1983, naive 24-year-old East German soldier Martin Rauch is pulled from his benign post as a border guard and given a new assignment: undercover spy for the Stasi foreign service in West Germany. Hiding in plain sight as Moritz Stamm in the West German army, Rauch must gather NATO military secrets. As he veers between father figures, love interests, and East and West Germany, nothing is quite what it seems and everyone he encounters is harboring secrets, both political and personal. The coming-of-age story -- created by American journalist and author Anna Winger and her German husband, Joerg Winger -- is the first German-language drama to be aired on a major U.S. network.
Based on the books "Bad Blood" by Vic Parsons and "The Gift" by Andre Picard, "Unspeakable" chronicles the early emergence of HIV and hepatitis C in Canada in the 1980s. It documents the tragedy that resulted in thousands of people who were infected by tainted blood. The blood scandal is one of the largest medical disasters in Canada's history, and it went on to trigger a federal inquiry and landmark lawsuit which resulted in billions of dollars being awarded to the victims. Robert C. Cooper was a victim of this and contracted hepatitis C from tainted blood.
In 1969, Tony Alamo and his wife, Susan, founded the Alamo Christian Foundation in Los Angeles, beginning careers as born-again, fire-and-brimstone televangelists. Attracting hippies and other discontented youth, the foundation soon evolved into a cult that is said to still be in operation. By avoiding law enforcement and maintaining a strict code of silence among followers, the Alamos gained immense power, becoming millionaires on the backs of their congregation. This four-episode docuseries shines a light on the Alamo empire through rarely-seen archival footage, including an exclusive videotaped deposition with Alamo himself. It also features interviews with the FBI agent who took Alamo down as well as cult survivors who have never previously shared their stories.