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Secrets of Wild India

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The diverse landscapes of India and the animals that live there.

Latest episodes

aired 274 days ago
In a battlefield ruled by tooth and claw, the Bengal tiger and the dhole, or Indian wild dog, compete for space, water and food.
aired 274 days ago
In the harsh desert and salty drylands of India's northwest, only the best adapted animals survive.
aired 274 days ago
Life among India's giant herbivores, as seen through the eyes of a newborn elephant calf.

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