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World's Funniest Fails: Science of Stupid

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Scientists reveal how adventures turn to misadventures by explaining some spectacular mishaps.

Latest episodes

aired 74 days ago
Witnessing some unfortunate run-ins with expanding gases and stored energy.
aired 74 days ago
Scientists reveal how adventures turn to misadventures by explaining some spectacular mishaps.
aired 74 days ago
Seeing how friction, Newton's laws and angular momentum play a role in seriously stupid accidents.
aired 74 days ago
Richard Hammond explores the painful potential of knocking down buildings; sledging; abusing airbags.
aired 74 days ago
The potential pain and humiliation that can come from karate kicks, urban biking and snowboarding on water.
aired 74 days ago
Richard Hammond explores the ways to embarrass, injure and humiliate yourself when horse riding, diving and playing with exercise balls.
aired 85 days ago
Exploring the hazards of ballet dancing and Jet Skiing; taking part in a good old-fashioned pillow fight; user-generated videos.
aired 85 days ago
Learning about the dangers of angular momentum in dance, friction in ice skating and rotation in soccer.
aired 92 days ago
Things go wrong for cats while they're jumping off slippery surfaces, balancing on fences and squeezing through cat flaps.
aired 92 days ago
Cold hard science is applied to user generated clips in this holiday special.
aired 99 days ago
Richard Hammond explores the potential to embarrass, injure and humiliate yourself when bungee jumping or flying a kite.
aired 99 days ago
Richard Hammond explores the potential to embarrass, injure and humiliate yourself when pole vaulting and ski jumping.
aired 99 days ago
People injure and humiliate themselves when driving over water, operating a crane and performing aerial tricks on skis.
aired 106 days ago
Table tennis players prepare like any other sports professionals; much can go wrong, as in any high-speed activity.
aired 106 days ago
Discovering the hazards of playing beer pong and what can go wrong when vaulting over walls and bouncing on gym balls.
aired 113 days ago
The things that can go wrong when visiting a water park, chest bumping or attempting a spinning karate kick.
aired 113 days ago
Learning about stretch, speed and centrifugal force through the hazards of rollerblading, spinning nunchucks and riding on miniature motorbikes.
aired 119 days ago
People racing on lawnmowers, abusing inflatables and hitting a piƱata; managing pressure, inertia and centrifugal force.
aired 119 days ago
Looking at reasons not to attempt to harness to momentum of a large flightless bird; how to generate vertical velocity with a puck.
aired 126 days ago
Exploring the many ways to be humiliated while climbing a lamppost, busting a break-dance and riding an off-road skateboard.
aired 126 days ago
Minimizing friction using wheels; varying degrees of impact force; the effects of having a high center of mass.

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