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Off the Hook: Extreme Catches

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Professional wrestler "Showtime" Eric Young, a novice outdoorsman, hosts this series in which he travels across the country to learn about some of the most extreme fishing techniques some people have come up with to try to catch the big one, including using pantyhose to catch sharks in the Atlantic Ocean and launching live bait with fire extinguishers on Lake Michigan. But Young doesn't just learn about these MacGyver-esque fishing techniques, he also tries his hand at each one. As Young puts it, he's "setting out to do some of the world's wildest, craziest fishing techniques." Crazy is definitely a good word to describe some of the methods.

Latest episodes

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Eric attempts to reel in an aptly named goliath grouper from Florida waters, using only a rope and his brute strength.
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In Hawaii, Eric cliff dives from a 70-foot ledge; fishing for ahi tuna in an outrigger canoe.
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Eric risks hypothermia and other dangers when he attempts free-dive spearfishing under an ice-covered Montreal river.
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Eric travels to Cape Cod and paddles a kayak miles off the coast to hunt the large and powerful bluefin tuna.
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Eric attends the International Eelpout Festival in Minnesota, an annual fishing tournament that attracts over 10,000 participants and partygoers.
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Eric travels to Alaska's Dutch Harbor, where he spends long hours in the frigid waters of the Bering Sea hunting for cod.
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Eric attempts to collect the Hawaiian delicacy known as opihi for his luau, then dives for octopuses and wrestles the creatures by hand.
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Eric stalks the invasive Asian carp in the rivers of Illinois; members of the Peoria Carp Hunters use samurai swords and other inventive weapons to dispatch their prey.
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Eric heads to the Louisiana bayou to take part in a spearfishing competition, then hunts the predatory crevalle jack.
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Eric fly-fishes for the deadly mako shark in San Diego, then dives for the delicacy known as sea urchin gonads.
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Eric grabs a spear gun and hunts for striped bass in a dangerously fast stretch of water in Long Island Sound.
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Eric heads to Tennessee, where some bikini-wearing local legends teach him the finer points of hand fishing.
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Eric travels to Rhode Island, where he tries skishing in Jamestown and nighttime squid jigging off Point Judith.
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Eric ventures 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina to fish in the Graveyard of the Atlantic, then hunts flounder in the shallow waters of Cape Carteret.
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Eric tries white-water kayak bass fishing on the Devils River in Texas, then travels to San Antonio to balloon fish for redfish.
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Eric uses plywood and an inner tube to build a raft, then sets out off the coast of Miami to nab a sailfish.
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Eric travels to Florida and tries to land a lemon shark, blacktip shark or bull shark while on a paddleboard.

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