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Lost Faces of the Bible

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Scientists seeking to reconstruct the features of ancient people.

Latest episodes

aired 1,335 days ago
For the first time in millennia, the face of a 3,000-year-old Philistine skull is revealed.
aired 1,393 days ago
In a remote desert cave, archaeologists discover skeletal remains lying next to funerary goods; perfectly preserved after 6,000 years.
aired 1,425 days ago
Archaeologists unearthed a shocking discovery while excavating an ancient village in Israel.
aired 1,439 days ago
Archaeologists reconstruct the life of a skeleton found in Galilee as the forensic team prepares to unveil the 2,000-year-old man's face.

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Modern techniques and archeology are able to shed new light on various times in history through the vestiges of the people who lived then.
The old Dolly Parton hit "9 to 5" isn't a tune worth humming for the blue-collar pioneers featured in "Filthy Riches." The series spotlights ingenious Americans who skirt a conventional workplace in favor of making a living in the deep rivers, soggy mud flats and wild backwoods of the U.S. Ray Turner, for example, has been catching eels in Delaware for 30 years. He uses a self-made smokehouse in the woods to cook the critters and sell them. Billy Taylor and his sons hunt for prized ginseng root in the Appalachians. Taylor, a fully licensed wild ginseng dealer, promotes sustainability by planting its berries. In Maine, Jim Campbell and Andy Johns make the coastal mud flats their office, as they dig for valuable bloodworms to sell to fishermen. And Greg Dahl and Albert DeSilva are burl hunters. A burl is a hard, unwieldy outgrowth on a tree, usually at the trunk. Burls have value because of the spectacular patterns found in them when cut open.
Henry Louis Gates Jr. hosts this four-hour documentary exploring how the United States emerged from the Civil War and slavery. Featuring interviews with historians, authors and other experts, the film explores the transformative years following the Civil War through the rise of Jim Crow segregation. The film also looks at blacks in art, music, literature and culture and the surge of political activism that eventually leads to the rise of civil rights organizations.
Fishing for bluefin tuna is a way of life for many residents of Gloucester, Mass. "Wicked Tuna" takes viewers into the unrelenting North Atlantic waters infamously spotlighted by the novel-turned-feature film "The Perfect Storm," to follow captains who are relied upon by their families, their shipmates, and by Gloucester itself, to haul in boatloads of the large but elusive bluefin. The pressure to deliver is unforgiving -- the fishing season is short and tuna populations are dwindling -- but one "monstah" catch can reel in just as large of a payday.
Duct tape won't do the job when it comes to the repairs featured in this series, an inside look at what happens when big industry breaks down. Host Sean Riley, a professional rigger with a passion for adventure, is on the scene as each one-hour episode depicts him working with some of the world's top mechanics making heavy-duty industrial repairs.
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Noah's ark, the Exodus, and the life and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth are some of the best-known stories in the Bible. They're also some of the narratives that are retold in a miniseries, "The Bible," that brings the accounts to life through a combination of live action and computer-generated animation. The program reveals new insights into many of the key biblical characters in the Old and New Testaments. Keith David narrates the series that stars actress Roma Downey ("Touched by an Angel") -- who also serves as an executive producer along with her husband, Mark Burnett.