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Homestead Rescue: Deconstructed

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Latest episodes

aired 262 days ago
The Raneys remember the time their own homestead fell into disrepair, requiring fast action to build a steel tram before the deep freeze sets in.
aired 262 days ago
Marty, Matt and Misty recall the time they took on an ambitious off-grid hydropower system after Tennessee storms take out a homestead's power source.
aired 262 days ago
Marty, Matt and Misty recall moving an entire cabin into a flood zone to test a new dam.
aired 262 days ago
The Raneys remember building a dam and moving a cabin into a flood zone.
aired 262 days ago
The Raneys recall putting a family on the path to self-sufficiency with long-term water, protein and power sources.
aired 263 days ago
The Raneys recall finding an uncontaminated water source for a family whose Kentucky homestead was plagued by toxic land.
aired 263 days ago
The Raneys recall finding a solution for an Idaho family whose failing homestead was threatened by an approaching wildfire.
aired 263 days ago
The Raneys recall clearing trees and creating an evacuation ark for a California homestead in the path of a raging wildfire.
aired 263 days ago
The Raneys recall the time they built an entire cabin from scratch on solid ground and harnessed a source of water from a natural spring for an amputee and his wife stranded on a cliff in their RV.
aired 263 days ago
The Raneys remember when they created their first-ever self-automated homestead in Alaska while a pair of firefighters are away on duty.
aired 263 days ago
The Raneys look back to the time they helped Oregon homesteaders build a barn complete with a subterranean garden and a humane approach to a predator threat.

Similar on YouTube TV

Various networks
Idyllic in nature, the concept of living a scaled-down, simpler, off-the-grid life has gained popularity in recent years, but the initial results for many budding homesteaders have been disappointing. The learning curve is steep, especially in the most dangerous and isolated locations across the country. Many families are not equipped with the skills, experience or knowledge of how to grow food, find water, harness power or deal with the threat of predators. In "Homestead Rescue," craftsman and survival expert Marty Raney -- joined by daughter Misty, a farmer, and son Matt, a hunter and fisherman -- attempt to teach these families the essential skills on how to survive -- and thrive -- in the wilderness. Because sustaining a homestead through hunting, fishing, gardening, building upkeep, security, and problem solving is a full-time job. At the conclusion of each episode, the rookie survivalists decide to either tough out their first year or pack up and return to civilization.
Extreme survivalists go head to head in a race across the Alaska wild. Using ingenuity, experience and just the gear they can carry in their packs, the participants have 60 hours to reach the finish point of each leg of the adventure -- the series features 13 legs -- and in addition to navigating treacherous glaciated river valleys, barren ridgelines, and high mountain peaks, the challengers battle hunger, dangerous predators and unpredictable weather. There is no grand prize awaiting each leg's winner, other than the pride of accomplishing a grueling feat. For season three, the 12 competitors are divided equally into four teams -- Military, Endurance, Alaskans and Lower 48.
Various networks
This series profiles life for the Kilcher family in the isolated community of Homer, Alaska. For four generations the Kilchers have lived off what their 600-acre homestead has provided, but cultivating that living is never easy. Led by patriarch Atz Kilcher and his brother Otto, the family spends the short summer and fall gardening, hunting and fishing for food, gathering supplies from the land and preparing their animals for the winter. Viewers also see the Kilchers living off the grid, where running water and electricity aren't daily staples, nor is contact with the outside world. Atz, by the way, is the father of music superstar Jewel.
Various networks
Episodes of "Alaska: The Last Frontier" with additional content.
Various networks
The breathtaking beauty of Alaska sometimes hides the fact its winters can be incredibly harsh, especially for those who live in the state's outlying areas. "Alaska: The Last Frontier" perfectly illustrates this reality, as the series profiles life for the Kilcher family in the isolated community of Homer. For four generations the Kilchers have lived off what their 600-acre homestead has provided, but cultivating that living is never easy. Led by patriarch Atz Kilcher and his brother Otto, the family spends the short summer and fall gardening, hunting and fishing for food, gathering supplies from the land and preparing their animals for the winter. Viewers, who may or may not have a fancy phone by their side while watching on their big-screen high-def TV, also see the Kilchers living off the grid, where running water and electricity aren't daily staples, nor is contact with the outside world. Atz, by the way, is the father of music superstar Jewel.
Various networks
TV's most extreme survival challenge just grew extra-large. Veteran survivalists familiar with the stripped-down drill after appearing on "Naked and Afraid" attempt to survive in a desolate, dangerous environment for 40 days -- 19 more than they previously experienced on the show. Pushing the very limits of human endurance, the men and women must all vie for the same limited food, water and shelter while avoiding territorial-sensitive predators and venom-filled reptiles. Because there is no other choice, the competitors quickly get to know one another -- and their surroundings -- and hope that their instincts, survival skills and intestinal fortitude serve them well.
Various networks
Discovery Channel adds to its staple of survival shows with a six-part series told from the participants' point of view. Four couples -- including a husband and wife, a boyfriend and girlfriend, and a mother and father -- endure the ultimate test of their skills and relationships by attempting to survive for three weeks in either the mountains of Morocco, the snow-covered fjords of Norway, or the unforgiving jungle of southern Mexico. With only the clothes on their backs and one bag stuffed with gear, each pair must live off the land, navigate vast, unknown terrain and overcome unique obstacles that stand between them and the safety of civilization. Throughout, the survivalists share with viewers accounts of their triumphs and setbacks.
Various networks
Deep in the backcountry of Idaho lies a protected wilderness area known as the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness. It encompasses a total of 2,366,757 acres, and it is the largest contiguous wilderness in the lower 48 states. The stunning region is characterized by rugged mountains, deep canyons and roaring rivers. The only direct way to access this area is a flight through steep canyons on a bush plane or a jet-boat journey through Class 5 whitewater rapids on the Salmon River. The wilderness area is home to a small community of homesteaders who are dependent on the pilots, boat captains and each other to survive. Discovery Channel's "River of No Return" introduces viewers to these homesteaders who rely on themselves, their neighbors and their survival skills to live life on their own terms in one of America's last frontiers.