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Big Fix Alaska

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Many Alaskans rely on heavy-duty equipment like bush planes, logging cranes and fishing boats to make a living. What happens, however, when the tools of the trade break down and the nearest help is hundreds of miles away? Braving the elements in wild, remote corners of the state to repair super machines are the full-service master mechanics at Jim's Equipment Repair, an Anchorage-based company serving residents since 1994. "Big Fix Alaska" chronicles the around-the-clock "rescues" made by owner Jim Evridge and his team, from stranded crab boats in the middle of the Bering Sea to frozen multimillion-dollar cranes near the North Pole.

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Patrolling America's largest state is the job of roughly 400 troopers in one of the toughest law enforcement agencies in the nation. Essentially, these cops say, nearly every Alaskan resident is armed and they know how to use their weapons, which makes any scenario a trooper encounters a potentially fatal one. Follow along as the "blue shirt" Alaskan State Troopers police the towns and villages, and the "brown shirt" Alaska Wildlife Troopers enforce regulations covering both commercial and sport fishing and hunting activities.
When bears, wolves and foxes are your only neighbors, life can be pretty lonely. Add minus-60-degree days and a constant battle for the most basic necessities, and you have the daily challenges of people who live in remote corners of Alaska. This series takes viewers deep into an Alaskan winter to meet tough, resilient residents as they try to stay one step ahead of storms and man-eating beasts to survive the season. The closest neighbor to Sue Aikens is more than 300 miles away. Eric Salitan subsists solely on what he hunts and forages. Chip and Agnes Hailstone catch fish for currency in bartering for supplies, and Andy and Kate Bassich use their pack of sled dogs for transportation. Also highlighted is a time of year not always part of what viewers see in Alaska: spring! Ice is breaking, animals are waking, and residents face new tests before deep cold returns.
The Guindons of Galveston, Texas, face year-round challenges to keep Katie's Seafood Market thriving. Acquiring the inventory is patriarch Buddy Guindon, brother Kenny and son Hans, who battle against long days, longer nights, a sea full of predators, and Mother Nature's quirkiness. Buddy's son Nick runs the business side of the company, juggling surpluses, shortages, and order deadlines while also processing a quarter of the Gulf's deep-water fish and spearheading initiatives to preserve their fishery. Through it all, the family built on traditional values always makes time for hearty laughs and home-cooked meals.
Extreme survivalists go head to head in a race across the Alaska wild. Using ingenuity, experience and just the gear they can carry in their packs, the participants have 60 hours to reach the finish point of each leg of the adventure -- the series features 13 legs -- and in addition to navigating treacherous glaciated river valleys, barren ridgelines, and high mountain peaks, the challengers battle hunger, dangerous predators and unpredictable weather. There is no grand prize awaiting each leg's winner, other than the pride of accomplishing a grueling feat. For season three, the 12 competitors are divided equally into four teams -- Military, Endurance, Alaskans and Lower 48.
Fishing for bluefin tuna is a way of life for many residents of Gloucester, Mass. "Wicked Tuna" takes viewers into the unrelenting North Atlantic waters infamously spotlighted by the novel-turned-feature film "The Perfect Storm," to follow captains who are relied upon by their families, their shipmates, and by Gloucester itself, to haul in boatloads of the large but elusive bluefin. The pressure to deliver is unforgiving -- the fishing season is short and tuna populations are dwindling -- but one "monstah" catch can reel in just as large of a payday.
Aquatic ecologist Zeb Hogan gets up close and personal with bizarre giants of the water, specimens equally enormous in proportion and odd in appearance. Among other adventures, Hogan investigates flying fish from Asia that are invading America's waterways, and he searches for one of North America's toothiest and most-misunderstood monster fish, the alligator gar. Some of the species Hogan encounters have survived for centuries but now face the threat of extinction, and he presents groundbreaking research undertaken to protect them.
Each year adventurers make Alaska's mighty Yukon River their home for five weeks. They float downstream on homemade log rafts to sell firewood and other supplies to remote villages. The reality-documentary "Yukon River Run" presents hourlong episodes tracking the progress of various crews. As harsh winter months approach and threaten both safety and success, stakes are heightened as rafters endeavor to cash out and escape from the cold.
From the producers of the multiple-award-winning miniseries "The Men Who Built America," National Geographic Channel chronicles competitions in innovation that pit history's brightest minds in the race to lay claim to the future. For them, the greatest challenge wasn't beating the odds -- it was beating their adversaries. From Steve Jobs vs. Bill Gates to William Hurst vs. Joseph Pulitzer, each hourlong episode focuses on a specific rivalry, delving into fierce power struggles, deceit, fluke timing and raw ambition out of which great ideas turned into reality. The conflicts play out through re-enactments that feature interviews with modern-day visionaries like Bill Nye, Steve Wozniak, Jack Welch, Steve Wynn and Michio Kaku.