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Wrong Man

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From Emmy-winning documentarian Joe Berlinger ("Paradise Lost" trilogy), "Wrong Man" is a six-episode documentary that dissects the cases of three inmates who may have been mistakenly incarcerated for decades. Investigations headed by renowned civil rights attorney Ronald Ruby, former prosecutor Sue-Ann Robinson, retired NCIS investigator Joe D. Kennedy, and Ira Lee Todd Jr., a member of Detroit's elite Homicide Task Force, uncover new theories, offer alternate suspects, and reveal new evidence that could prove these inmates are not guilty.

Latest episodes

VOD available
The investigative team looks for a killer on the loose, hoping to exonerate Christopher Tapp who is serving time; then, after two decades, a surprise offer by the prosecution comes Tapp's way.
VOD available
"Wrong Man's" team of experts and an Idaho investigator examine Christopher Tapp's claim that he was coerced into falsely confessing to the brutal murder of Angie Dodge on June 13, 1996, in Idaho Falls, Idaho.
VOD available
Curtis Flowers is convicted of a quadruple murder; after 21 years of prosecutions, six trials, and questionable tactics by the State of Mississippi, one wonders if it possible to determine Flowers' guilt or innocence.
VOD available
On July 16, 1996, Bertha Tardy and three of her employees were murdered; Curtis Flowers was arrested and went on to be tried six times over 21 years; he faces a possible seventh trial, while maintaining his innocence.
VOD available
Investigators Ira Todd and Joe Kennedy meet with the lead detective on the Salas case; the detective claims an informant implicated Evaristo, but when the informant comes forward, the team is shocked by what it learns.
VOD available
16-year-old Evaristo Junior Salas is sent to prison for three decades for a crime he says he did not commit; a team comes together to investigate whether Salas was brought to justice or railroaded by the system.