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World's Toughest Fixes

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Duct tape won't do the job when it comes to the repairs featured in this series, an inside look at what happens when big industry breaks down. Host Sean Riley, a professional rigger with a passion for adventure, is on the scene as each one-hour episode depicts him working with some of the world's top mechanics making heavy-duty industrial repairs.

Latest episodes

aired 360 days ago
The Large Hadron Collider needs repairs.
aired 360 days ago
Riley heads to Alaska to join a dangerous repair on the Trans-Atlantic Pipeline.
aired 360 days ago
Putting up a ski lift in the Rocky Mountains with the help of a K-Max helicopter.
aired 367 days ago
A team of specialists has 15 days to find and repair a leak on a luxury ship.
aired 367 days ago
Riley helps repair Cirque du Soleil's malfunctioning rotating main stage in Las Vegas.
aired 367 days ago
Problems with three iconic bridges in the United Kingdom are repaired.
aired 369 days ago
Riley joins a crew lifting a 50 ton boiler up a tower and suspending it above 24,000 mirrors in order to complete America's first large scale solar power tower.
aired 369 days ago
A football field-sized section of roadway is cut from San Francisco's Bay Bridge and replaced within 72 hours.
aired 369 days ago
Riley dives into the Caribbean to remove a 50-ton rudder from a damaged ship.
aired 484 days ago
Riley joins an Alaskan salvage crew battling ice and wind as they try to clear an old boat that ran aground on a protected seal habitat.
aired 491 days ago
Riley joins a traveling daredevil act to fix a 2,000-foot-high TV tower with a faulty antenna.
aired 491 days ago
Riley heads into the jungle to help a team of rocket scientists and engineers launch a satellite into orbit.
aired 491 days ago
Riley heads to a nuclear power plant to watch a high-pressure turbine swap.

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