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Vet School

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Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine opens its doors, allowing viewers exclusive access to follow first-year students mastering the basics, and fourth-year students handling difficult cases from hamsters to horses. The documentary series shows the blood, sweat and tears required to become a licensed vet, beginning with a mountain of information that students must digest, commit to memory and recall at a moment's notice. Then it's on to tasks like restraining animals, repairing fractures, inserting pacemakers, and removing abscesses, before the chaos of emergency room procedures are introduced.

Latest episodes

aired 462 days ago
Treating a dog that cannot see; working in anesthesiology; a terrified student works with horses for the first time; how to handle a horse for a basic mouth exam.
aired 462 days ago
A blind cow; an adorable puppy named Chance might have cancer; attending labs to learn about specialty horse care; how to make the perfect knot and how to draw blood.
aired 462 days ago
Performing surgery on a West Highland white terrier to prevent her from going blind; an Alaskan malamute who has ingested antifreeze; an unusual cardiology patient; a large steer gets a hoof trim.
aired 550 days ago
The first-year students are extremely busy preparing for their final.
aired 550 days ago
Fourth-year student Singen Elliott participates in a surgery on a young horse named Victor with an angular limb deformity.
aired 551 days ago
A patient's x-ray reveals something unusual; a dog with a suspected breathing issue; a miniature donkey in for a seemingly simple general checkup.
aired 551 days ago
Students start their career by dancing; one student loves large animals but must rotate through small animals first; a bulldog with congestive heart failure.
aired 551 days ago
A first-year student gets an introduction to the chaos of an ER; a fourth-year student gets hands-on work during a surgery to remove 10 teeth from a cat.

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From the creators of the real-time law enforcement series "Live PD" comes a version for animal lovers. It captures the fast-paced drama and intensity of a hospital procedural mixed with the unbreakable bonds between pets and their owners. Host Mark Steines ("Entertainment Tonight") is joined by veterinary experts in the studio to guide viewers through each episode, giving commentary on what is seen at featured animal hospitals and mobile vet clinics around the country. Cameras trail teams of emergency veterinarians and specialists as they work tirelessly through the night to save the lives of pets. The series also accompanies on-call vets to homes and farms to treat animals that are too sick or too big to travel.
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