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Vet School

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Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine opens its doors, allowing viewers exclusive access to follow first-year students mastering the basics, and fourth-year students handling difficult cases from hamsters to horses. The documentary series shows the blood, sweat and tears required to become a licensed vet, beginning with a mountain of information that students must digest, commit to memory and recall at a moment's notice. Then it's on to tasks like restraining animals, repairing fractures, inserting pacemakers, and removing abscesses, before the chaos of emergency room procedures are introduced.

Latest episodes

aired 87 days ago
Treating a dog that cannot see; working in anesthesiology; a terrified student works with horses for the first time; how to handle a horse for a basic mouth exam.
aired 87 days ago
A blind cow; an adorable puppy named Chance might have cancer; attending labs to learn about specialty horse care; how to make the perfect knot and how to draw blood.
aired 87 days ago
Performing surgery on a West Highland white terrier to prevent her from going blind; an Alaskan malamute who has ingested antifreeze; an unusual cardiology patient; a large steer gets a hoof trim.
aired 175 days ago
The first-year students are extremely busy preparing for their final.
aired 176 days ago
Fourth-year student Singen Elliott participates in a surgery on a young horse named Victor with an angular limb deformity.
aired 176 days ago
A patient's x-ray reveals something unusual; a dog with a suspected breathing issue; a miniature donkey in for a seemingly simple general checkup.
aired 176 days ago
Students start their career by dancing; one student loves large animals but must rotate through small animals first; a bulldog with congestive heart failure.
aired 176 days ago
A first-year student gets an introduction to the chaos of an ER; a fourth-year student gets hands-on work during a surgery to remove 10 teeth from a cat.

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Various networks
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