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The Savage Line

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Making a job site as safe as possible is the work of Cory Valdes, Jason Lesmeister, Rob Hardy and Puma Ghostwalker. Under normal circumstances the profession poses inherent risks, but the conditions these guys encounter are anything but normal. Valdes, Lesmeister, Hardy and Ghostwalker are experienced outdoorsmen and trackers who traverse the world's most remote places to protect the lives of wildlife photographers, fishermen, loggers, farmers and others working in the backyards of nature's fiercest predators. Keeping the peace between man and wolves, black bears, alligators and wild boars represents just another day at the office on "The Savage Line."

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