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The Numbers Game

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Could you be a boss? Are you a liar? How tough are you? Do you live on the edge? Those questions and others like them are asked and then answered by data scientist Jake Porway to reveal surprising information. Porway recites mind-bending stats, conducts entertaining man-on-the-street experiments, and takes part in interactive games, all in the name of providing insight into life's mysteries in a fast-paced, engaging way.

Latest episodes

aired 601 days ago
Dig up all the numbers you need to find a way through any disaster.
aired 601 days ago
Having some fun with the idea of code breaking; a look at the thought processes behind solving puzzles and mysterious codes in history.
aired 625 days ago
Break down the mechanics of persuasion by understanding how to influence people.
aired 632 days ago
How to tap into the benefits of being a jerk without making a long list of enemies.
aired 632 days ago
Jake demonstrates that lying isn't always about getting what we want, nor is it necessarily mean-spirited; but lying is prevalent, so he'll explain how to spot a lie to avoid getting duped.
aired 639 days ago
The science behind true boss-level leadership; the two top traits of the best bosses.
aired 639 days ago
Revealing why some people are more likely to believe in superstitions than others.
aired 646 days ago
Find out just how much of a daredevil you really are.
aired 646 days ago
Discover how toughness is about more than just strength and explores the science behind the basic building blocks of toughness.
aired 714 days ago
Jake shares all the key secrets to increasing your own physical hotness.
aired 751 days ago
Jake proves that heroes aren't necessarily the strongest.
aired 752 days ago
How to spare yourself the embarrassment of being a sucker just in time for April Fools' Day.

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