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AMC has proven its considerable skill in producing historical Western content ("Broken Trail," "Hell on Wheels"). The network dips into the same well again with the limited event series "The American West," a docudrama that shows how, in the aftermath of the Civil War, the United States transforms into the "land of opportunity," a violent world dominated by cowboys, Indians, outlaws and law men. Across eight episodes, little-known stories are told of Western legends such as Jesse James, Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull. The series also features exclusive interviews with notable names from classic Western films, including James Caan, Tom Selleck, Kiefer Sutherland, Ed Harris and more.

Latest episodes

aired 286 days ago
Sitting Bull is accused of inciting a rebellion; Wyatt Earp turns his back on the law in his search for true justice; Jesse James is confronted by the Ford Brothers.
aired 290 days ago
Wyatt Earp heads to Tombstone; Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett's cat-and-mouse game reaches a climax; Sitting Bill is back in America.
aired 290 days ago
Jesse James resurfaces after years in hiding; Billy the Kid avenges the death of his friend; Wyatt Earp questions his future as a man of the law.
aired 299 days ago
Billy the Kid uses his talent with a gun to get what he wants; Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse make an important decision; Wyatt Earp fights for what's right.
aired 307 days ago
Custer rides to a showdown at Little Big Horn with the Sioux; Jesse James hopes to make a big statement when he targets a bank in the northern territory.
aired 308 days ago
Allan Pinkerton gets hired to bring Jesse James to justice; settlers descend upon Sioux land to mine gold; Grant tries to keep the peace.
aired 308 days ago
Jesse James targets the railroads; Custer goes on a secret mission in Sioux Territory; Grant contends with the growing unrest in the South and West.

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