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Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

Latest episodes

aired 1,040 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,040 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,043 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,043 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,047 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,047 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,047 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,047 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,050 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,050 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,054 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,057 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,057 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,061 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,061 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,061 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,061 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,064 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,064 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,064 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 1,064 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

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In this offbeat game show, players picked up in the Cash Cab have to answer trivia questions with mounting cash values before they reach their destination in order to win. If a player answers incorrectly three times, he is kicked out of the cab without any money. Help options include a Mobile Shout-Out (phone call) and Street Shout-Out (asking a stranger on the street). Once the player reaches his destination, he can leave the cab with his winnings, if any, or risk them on a more difficult question. A correct final answer doubles his winnings; an incorrect answer means he leaves the cab with no money at all. Comic Ben Bailey takes the cab's wheel as host.
A contestant must choose from 26 sealed briefcases containing a marker for various amounts of cash from one penny to $1 million. The player then eliminates the remaining 25 cases one by one. The chosen ones are opened and the amount of money inside revealed. After several cases are opened, the player is tempted by the Banker to accept an offer of cash in exchange for not continuing the game and possibly winning a larger sum of money.