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Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

Latest episodes

aired 550 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 553 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 553 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 554 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 557 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 557 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 557 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 557 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 557 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 557 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 560 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 560 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 562 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 564 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 564 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 564 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 564 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 571 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 571 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 571 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 571 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

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Various networks
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A contestant must choose from 26 sealed briefcases containing a marker for various amounts of cash from one penny to $1 million. The player then eliminates the remaining 25 cases one by one. The chosen ones are opened and the amount of money inside revealed. After several cases are opened, the player is tempted by the Banker to accept an offer of cash in exchange for not continuing the game and possibly winning a larger sum of money.
Various networks
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