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Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

Latest episodes

aired 490 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 494 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 494 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 494 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 497 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 497 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 497 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 497 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 497 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 498 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 501 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 501 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 502 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 504 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 504 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 505 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 505 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 511 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 511 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 512 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 512 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

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