Watch on YouTube TV

Sports Jeopardy!

Watch live TV from 40+ networks
Cloud DVR with no storage limits
6 accounts per household included
$35/month.
Cancel anytime.
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

Latest episodes

aired 122 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 136 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 136 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 136 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 136 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 132 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 132 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 132 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 129 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 129 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 129 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 126 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 126 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 122 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 122 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 122 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 139 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 115 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 115 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 115 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 111 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 111 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 108 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 108 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 108 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 105 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 105 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 105 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 105 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 283 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 304 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 304 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 304 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 297 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 297 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 297 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 297 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 294 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 294 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 294 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 294 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 290 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 290 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 290 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 290 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 283 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 283 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 275 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 239 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 217 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 216 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 195 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 195 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 143 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 143 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 143 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 139 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 139 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 139 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 52 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 73 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 73 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 69 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 69 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 66 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 66 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 66 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 59 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 59 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 59 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 59 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 59 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 56 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 52 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 52 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 73 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 52 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 48 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 45 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 45 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 45 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 45 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 31 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 31 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 31 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 31 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 24 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 24 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 24 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 24 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 87 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 104 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 101 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 101 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 101 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 101 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 94 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 94 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 94 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 94 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 87 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 87 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 87 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 311 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 85 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 83 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 83 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 80 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 80 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 80 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 80 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 80 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 80 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 77 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 76 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 76 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 73 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 73 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 391 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 412 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 409 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 409 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 409 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 409 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 405 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 405 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 402 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 398 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 398 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 395 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 395 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 395 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 395 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 391 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 412 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 388 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 388 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 388 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 384 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 384 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 384 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 384 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 384 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 384 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 381 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 381 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 381 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 381 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 377 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 430 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 451 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 447 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 447 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 444 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 444 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 444 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 444 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 440 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 440 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 437 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 437 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 437 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 433 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 433 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 430 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 377 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 430 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 430 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 423 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 423 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 423 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 423 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 416 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 416 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 416 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 416 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 412 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 412 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 412 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 412 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 328 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 346 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 346 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 346 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 339 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 339 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 339 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 339 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 335 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 335 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 335 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 335 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 332 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 332 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 332 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 332 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 346 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 328 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 325 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 325 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 325 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 325 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 321 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 321 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 318 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 318 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 318 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 318 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 311 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 311 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 311 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 360 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 374 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 374 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 374 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 371 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 371 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 370 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 370 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 367 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 367 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 367 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 367 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 363 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 363 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 363 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 451 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 360 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 360 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 360 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 356 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 356 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 353 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 353 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 353 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 353 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 350 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 350 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 349 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 349 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.
aired 349 days ago
Knowing about William "Refrigerator" Perry may be more beneficial than having extensive knowledge of William Shakespeare on this version of the long-running "Jeopardy!" franchise. The format is familiar: the host -- in this case, longtime sportscaster Dan Patrick -- gives the contestants the answers, and they must provide the corresponding questions. There are, however, some key differences between this show and its popular parent. Most notable is each category contains only four clues rather than five, and the clues are worth points instead of cash. The contestant who accumulates the most points by the end of each episode wins $5,000. Starting in Season 2, the show allows the winning contestant to return on the next episode, which means if a player is "en fuego," to borrow one of Patrick's catchphrases from his ESPN days, and goes on a winning streak, he or she can build up the bucks. And, yes, the famous Final Jeopardy "think music" is here in a modified form.

Similar on YouTube TV

"Jeopardy!" is a classic game show -- with a twist. The answers are given first, and the contestants supply the questions. Three contestants, including the previous show's champion, compete in six categories and in three rounds (with each round's "answers" being worth more prize money). In the third round, "Final Jeopardy," the contestants can name their own jackpot -- as long as it's within the amount of money they've already earned. If a player finishes the second round with zero dollars, they are eliminated from "Final Jeopardy." The first version of "Jeopardy!," which aired from 1964 to 1975 on NBC, was hosted by Art Fleming. Alex Trebek is the current host; he began with the program in 1984 (at the start of its syndicated run).
Contestants guess hidden phrases by guessing letters one at a time. Contestants win money or prizes, as determined by a spin of the wheel, for each correct consonant they guess. But they have to pay to see what vowels are in a puzzle. The contestant that has amassed the most winnings at the end of a game goes on to play the bonus round, in which the player can win even more -- prizes frequently seen in the bonus round include automobiles, vacations and more cash.
The former ESPN mainstay hosts this simulcast of his weekday talk radio show, during which he interviews the top personalities in the world of sports in his trademark wry, irreverent style. He also on occasion welcomes entertainers and political figures to the program, and he's been known to make playful bets with his guests.
Host Dan Patrick's daily nationally syndicated sports talk radio program. Includes interviews and discussions with the biggest stars in sports and entertainment.
Correctly answering 14 multiple-choice questions could net contestants $1 million on a half-hour quiz show that's had a long run since its adaptation from the Brit show with the same name. Its format has evolved, but the basics remain: Answer trivia questions to win what could be very big bucks. Safety nets along the way guarantee sums that can't be lost once a contestant reaches certain thresholds -- and players can quit any time, but going for the million carries the risk of losing hundreds of thousands with one wrong answer. Contestants get "lifelines" to help reach the top.