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South Pacific

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"Planet Earth: South Pacific" is a six-part British nature documentary that surveys the natural history of the islands of the South Pacific regions including many spots in New Zealand. The program documents the natural history of the region, the South Pacific spans from the Hawaiian Islands to New Zealand and can be home to a variety of animal life and plant life. Viewers can see in depth looks at how the remote islands were colonized, see rare footage of an underwater volcano erupting, and the varying ecological niches. Hosted by Benedict Cumberbatch.

Latest episodes

aired 14 days ago
With flightless parrots, burrowing bats, giant skinks and kangaroos in trees, wildlife has evolved in extraordinary ways on the isolated islands of the South Pacific.
aired 14 days ago
Witness the birth, growth and death of an island in the greatest ocean on Earth.
aired 15 days ago
Larger than all the worlds land masses combined, the Pacific is the vastest ocean on Earth.
aired 15 days ago
A closer look into the blue will reveal a scattering of islands, from the Tropics to the sub-Antartic waters of the Southern Ocean.
aired 15 days ago
A closer look into the blue will reveal a scattering of islands, from the Tropics to the sub-Antartic waters of the Southern Ocean.
aired 51 days ago
A fragile paradise in the South Pacific is revealed; international fishing fleets take a serious toll on the region's sharks, albatross and tuna.

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