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Smoky Mountain Money

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If it's September in North Carolina, it's time to harvest wild ginseng. The endangered plant is protected by federal law, thus procuring it to produce adaptogenic herbs is heavily regulated. "Smoky Mountain Money" follows the trails of teams who forage for the valuable root. Those folks come from long lines of "Sengers" who respect the resource -- picking only some of the growth to allow the crop to continue to thrive and provide income for future generations. Competition is fierce and territorial for the man-shaped root worth $10,000 on the Asian market.

Latest episodes

aired 66 days ago
Winter has reached the Smoky Mountains and the teams have one last chance to dig enough ginseng to reach their goals for the season.
aired 66 days ago
The four teams go up against the winter elements to continue hunting for ginseng in the Smoky Mountains.
aired 66 days ago
Frost threatens the Smoky Mountains, but ginseng hunters continue to dig with only a few precious days left.
aired 66 days ago
As thunderstorms soak the Smoky Mountains, teams ignore severe weather warnings and enter the most isolated peaks and hollows of North Carolina in search of ginseng.
aired 110 days ago
Ginseng season is in full swing and four teams of hunters are challenged by ancient trails explored by native Cherokee and early settlers.
aired 110 days ago
Four teams set out to hunt for highly valuable but hard-to-find ginseng root.

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