Watch on YouTube TV

Rocky Mountain Law

Watch live TV from 50+ networks
Cloud DVR with no storage limits
6 accounts per household included
Cancel anytime.
National Geographic Channel crews traverse one of America's most rugged territories -- the Rocky Mountains -- in the presence of law enforcement officers who protect and serve both residents and the magnificent mountains. While investigating crimes ranging from murders and drug running to domestic disputes, sheriff deputies in Boulder, Eagle and Grand counties conduct manhunts by foot, skis or snowmobiles, helping to ensure that a great natural treasure remains pristine and secure.

Similar on YouTube TV

Set in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Appalachia, "Southern Justice" documents -- in a cinema verite fashion -- the work of law enforcement agencies in Sullivan County, Tenn., and Ashe County, N.C. With a combined population of fewer than 200,000, both small counties have their local charm, but they also have their share of hardships. Methamphetamine, prescription drugs, and alcohol play a role in a large portion of local crimes. Incorporating a shared philosophy best described as"Andy Griffith in the 21st century," the sheriffs and their deputies are tasked with protecting these unique, close-knit communities, and they often must use a mixture of action and compassion. And if a peaceful solution proves impossible, both agencies are ready with SWAT teams to handle the most violent situations.
Stacy Keach narrates this dissection of the dark side of the American Dream, a survey of how far some people go to become rich, no matter the cost to themselves and those around them. Real-life cases are reviewed and involve such criminal activity as credit card scams, identity theft, counterfeiting and Ponzi schemes.
How does the drug trade work? Can it be stopped or should it be regulated? And what are the personal costs? Those are just some of the questions asked in this series, a comprehensive look at society's most abused drugs: cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and marijuana. First-person perspectives from traffickers, dealers, users, law enforcement and medical professionals detail how the drugs are processed and moved onto the streets, and the effects they have on the human body. It's a raw, eye-opening documentary about a billion-dollar industry.
Fishing for bluefin tuna is a way of life for many residents of Gloucester, Mass. "Wicked Tuna" takes viewers into the unrelenting North Atlantic waters infamously spotlighted by the novel-turned-feature film "The Perfect Storm," to follow captains who are relied upon by their families, their shipmates, and by Gloucester itself, to haul in boatloads of the large but elusive bluefin. The pressure to deliver is unforgiving -- the fishing season is short and tuna populations are dwindling -- but one "monstah" catch can reel in just as large of a payday.
As one of the lead designers for nine seasons on ABC's Emmy-winning "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," Paul DiMeo encountered his share of next-to-impossible construction projects. So building wilderness retreats is a walk in the park by comparison, right? Not so fast. Paulie, as he is known, and master fabricator Pat "Tuffy" Bakaitis are partners in a cabin design and construction business called Cabin Kings, and in "Building Wild," the duo create unbelievable rustic getaways, transforming discarded materials into eye-catching contraptions and overcoming outrageous building challenges along the way. In each episode, Paulie and Tuffy provide the big ideas and construction know-how to a client looking to build a backwoods paradise on a challenging property. To keep costs low, the landowners supply some materials, bring together a workforce of friends and family and agree to do the entire build in one week.
Patrolling America's largest state is the job of roughly 400 troopers in one of the toughest law enforcement agencies in the nation. Essentially, these cops say, nearly every Alaskan resident is armed and they know how to use their weapons, which makes any scenario a trooper encounters a potentially fatal one. Follow along as the "blue shirt" Alaskan State Troopers police the towns and villages, and the "brown shirt" Alaska Wildlife Troopers enforce regulations covering both commercial and sport fishing and hunting activities.
Money and goods mean nothing to the people in "Live Free or Die." The series depicts a trend called "rewilding" -- the undomestication of humans -- and follows those who've rejected a mainstream existence to live off the land, in simple homes without electricity or running water. Being self-sufficient is a constant challenge, as obstacles like brutal weather and depleted food stocks require quick, innovative solutions. Modern pioneers include Colbert, a former financial adviser now living in a Georgia swamp; Gabriel, whose California lifestyle alternates between the mountains and the sea; and Tony and Amelia, who turned a hillside in the Blue Ridge Mountains into a garden.
When bears, wolves and foxes are your only neighbors, life can be pretty lonely. Add minus-60-degree days and a constant battle for the most basic necessities, and you have the daily challenges of people who live in remote corners of Alaska. This series takes viewers deep into an Alaskan winter to meet tough, resilient residents as they try to stay one step ahead of storms and man-eating beasts to survive the season. The closest neighbor to Sue Aikens is more than 300 miles away. Eric Salitan subsists solely on what he hunts and forages. Chip and Agnes Hailstone catch fish for currency in bartering for supplies, and Andy and Kate Bassich use their pack of sled dogs for transportation. Also highlighted is a time of year not always part of what viewers see in Alaska: spring! Ice is breaking, animals are waking, and residents face new tests before deep cold returns.