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Life Below Zero: Port Protection

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People push the limits of survival in the remote community of Port Protection in Alaska.

Latest episodes

aired 103 days ago
Residents of Port Protection undertake arduous tasks to ensure their winter survival.
aired 103 days ago
Port Protection's dwellers use old methods and tenacity to survive the midpoint of winter.
aired 103 days ago
Winter has arrived in Port Protection, and residents struggle to survive the elements.
aired 103 days ago
With winter looming, Port Protection's residents prepare themselves for harsh times.
aired 103 days ago
Port Protection's residents must adapt to the will of the forest and the sea to survive.
aired 103 days ago
Residents of Port Protection must work together to prepare for the cold winter ahead.
aired 103 days ago
As residents of Port Protection prepare for winter, old tools and new skills are vital.
aired 103 days ago
In Port Protection, learning to live alongside Mother Nature is the only way to survive.
aired 103 days ago
Danger lurks around every corner for Port Protection residents; Mary Miller hunts deer while being menaced by wolves; Curly Leach contends with grueling weather; Gary Muehlberger faces violent seas to fill his freezer with fish.
aired 104 days ago
As the Arctic winter approaches, residents of Port Protection must survive at all costs.
aired 104 days ago
To survive in a remote island in Alaska, the men and women of Port Protection need to depend on one another.
aired 104 days ago
Port Protection builds strong relationships to thrive in the Alaskan wild.
aired 104 days ago
Trapping is more than an activity in Port Protection, Alaska, it's a lifestyle.
aired 104 days ago
The men and women of Port Protection, Alaska, must master the art of sustainability in order to survive on a remote island in Alaska.

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The producers of National Geographic Channel's hit series "Life Below Zero" are behind "Port Protection," which profiles individuals trying to survive way above the Lower 48. Surrounded by the North Pacific, Port Protection is a remote community tucked into the northwest corner of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. The approximately 100 residents who call the rugged, unforgiving land home push the limits of survival, living an isolated and risky existence of self-reliance with no roads, government or law enforcement. However, they think the risk is worth the profound reward: a world of beauty with the security of community without the constraints of bureaucracy.
Various networks
The raw beauty of Alaska's wilderness is the real star of this gripping limited series that doubles as a travelogue and a guide to survival on the last American frontier.
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Back to the beautiful state of Alaska for another reality-documentary series, this one set in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a protected area home to thousands of native animals... and a handful of people. In 1980, the U.S. government banned human occupation in the refuge, and only residents in seven permitted cabins are allowed to remain. The series depicts the daily rituals of four families living in isolation and contending with bitter weather, frustrating setbacks, and aggressive wildlife in an unspoiled and unforgiving wilderness. The nonconformists include Heimo Korth, the "godfather of the final frontier," and wife Edna; Bob Harte, who has spent 40 years living by his own rules; and young couple Bob and Ashley Selden, who admit that they've survived by trial and error, learning day by day the harsh reality of frontier living.
Extreme survivalists go head to head in a race across the Alaska wild. Using ingenuity, experience and just the gear they can carry in their packs, the participants have 60 hours to reach the finish point of each leg of the adventure -- the series features 13 legs -- and in addition to navigating treacherous glaciated river valleys, barren ridgelines, and high mountain peaks, the challengers battle hunger, dangerous predators and unpredictable weather. There is no grand prize awaiting each leg's winner, other than the pride of accomplishing a grueling feat. For season three, the 12 competitors are divided equally into four teams -- Military, Endurance, Alaskans and Lower 48.
When bears, wolves and foxes are your only neighbors, life can be pretty lonely. Add minus-60-degree days and a constant battle for the most basic necessities, and you have the daily challenges of people who live in remote corners of Alaska. This series takes viewers deep into an Alaskan winter to meet tough, resilient residents as they try to stay one step ahead of storms and man-eating beasts to survive the season. The closest neighbor to Sue Aikens is more than 300 miles away. Eric Salitan subsists solely on what he hunts and forages. Chip and Agnes Hailstone catch fish for currency in bartering for supplies, and Andy and Kate Bassich use their pack of sled dogs for transportation. Also highlighted is a time of year not always part of what viewers see in Alaska: spring! Ice is breaking, animals are waking, and residents face new tests before deep cold returns.
Various networks
Tanana, Alaska, is like the Pacific Northwest's version of Hotel California: You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave. Well, not exactly, but describing the town as remote is akin to saying the winters are chilly. Located at the junction of the Tanana and Yukon rivers deep in the state's interior, the town has no roads in or out, and for its 200-plus residents, survival in the winter is a daily challenge. "Yukon Men" unveils the people of Tanana, who struggle to find food, heat their homes, and ward off predators. But they stick together, a bond that helps them overcome the harsh conditions.
Various networks
After a three-day crash course in fundamental survival skills, nine amateur hikers, campers and outdoor enthusiasts are flown into the rugged Alaska interior, given part of a map and some basic tools and told to hike to civilization -- ideally before harsh and potentially deadly winter weather sets in. It sounds like "Survivor," but with a big difference: The participants signed on, not for a million-dollar prize (there isn't one), but simply for the chance of a lifetime to challenge themselves in tough yet breathtakingly beautiful terrain.
Various networks
"Alaskan Bush People" is a reality-documentary series that introduces the Brown family -- Billy, wife Ami and their seven grown children who -- according to Discovery -- are interesting because "they are unlike any other family in America." The channel says they are so far removed from civilization that they often go six to nine months each year without seeing an outsider. They refer to themselves as a "wolf pack" and, perhaps due to isolation, have their own accent and dialect. The Browns live in the Copper River Valley, where temperatures can drop to 60 degrees below zero, and the family recently relocated and built a cabin there because, they say, their former home of many years was seized and burned down for being in the wrong location on public land.
Various networks
Building off the grid is challenging enough, but doing so in some of the most unforgiving terrain on Earth becomes a monumental test. This series follows the intrepid journeys of men and women who gladly face Alaska's extreme conditions and harsh elements to construct one-of-a-kind lodges among the stunning landscape. Undeterred crews work up to 16 hours a day to complete dream cabins before the arrival of winter, while overcoming total isolation, inclement weather, rough seas, and the occasional visit by grizzly bears.
Various networks
Tradition collides with transformation in McCarthy, Alaska. The isolated town -- once considered to be the state's version of "Sin City" -- flourished during the Gold Rush but is now home to roughly 40 people, a mix of mavericks, risk takers and rabble rousers willing to brave extreme conditions to live free. While some believe in continuing the town's frontier way of life, others feel the future of McCarthy depends on dragging it into the modern age. Long-standing resident Jeremy Keller fights to protect its roots, while Neil Darish has purchased multiple properties in town and plans to restore its vibrancy. "Edge of Alaska" tells the story of a hinterland at a crossroads.