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Judge Faith

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Faith Jenkins' life has taken her on a path from being a Louisiana beauty queen to Wall Street attorney and a tough prosecutor in New York, and now she brings her justice background to television as the star of her own court show. The no-nonsense judge presides over arbitration-based cases that are presented by defendants. As in most courts, televised or otherwise, some cases are straightforward while others have some twists to them.

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