Watch on YouTube TV

Inside Combat Rescue

Watch live TV from 40+ networks
Cloud DVR with no storage limits
6 accounts per household included
$35/month.
Cancel anytime.
"I have no problem sacrificing myself for someone else. It's my job." So says a member of the elite Combat Rescue unit of the U.S. Air Force, whose job it is to come to the aid of American or Allied forces who are either injured or are in extreme danger. "Inside Combat Rescue," the result of unprecedented access provided to National Geographic Channel, takes viewers inside the harrowing world of the brave airmen -- Pararescuemen or PJs, as they're known -- during a four-month deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan. More than two dozen missions are chronicled in the series, using strategically placed cameras on airmen's helmets and more than 40 cameras mounted both inside and outside of the Air Force's Pave Hawk helicopters. PJs and their rescue teammates race against time to save Americans, coalition forces, Afghan allies and even local Afghan families caught in the crossfire within the "golden hour," the critical first hour that's often the difference between life and death.

Latest episodes

VOD available
In the last weeks of deployment, a motorcycle-borne IED blows up near Kandahar city and 10 Afghan civilians need immediate rescue.
VOD available
An elite Air Force paramedic rescue unit deploys to Afghanistan; an Afghan civilian is injured in an explosive device blast and the unite must treat and transport him to the hospital within the hour to save his life.
VOD available
What life is like in Afghanistan for Thomas, Justin, Chris and their fellow airmen; the team evacuates two Afghan allies who have been shot and must change their landing tactics when one of the guns on their chopper breaks in midair.
VOD available
The critical window of time in which PJs strive to complete a rescue and offer the injured their best chance of survival a can be delayed by chaos and confusion.
VOD available
Barry's first deployment is inside a warzone; Matt and Trevor look after a new pararesueman they call "Babyface."
VOD available
A seasoned veteran, a new father, and a rookie fly into the heart of a battle to rescue two of their own.

Similar on YouTube TV

The old Dolly Parton hit "9 to 5" isn't a tune worth humming for the blue-collar pioneers featured in "Filthy Riches." The series spotlights ingenious Americans who skirt a conventional workplace in favor of making a living in the deep rivers, soggy mud flats and wild backwoods of the U.S. Ray Turner, for example, has been catching eels in Delaware for 30 years. He uses a self-made smokehouse in the woods to cook the critters and sell them. Billy Taylor and his sons hunt for prized ginseng root in the Appalachians. Taylor, a fully licensed wild ginseng dealer, promotes sustainability by planting its berries. In Maine, Jim Campbell and Andy Johns make the coastal mud flats their office, as they dig for valuable bloodworms to sell to fishermen. And Greg Dahl and Albert DeSilva are burl hunters. A burl is a hard, unwieldy outgrowth on a tree, usually at the trunk. Burls have value because of the spectacular patterns found in them when cut open.
Academy Award winner Morgan Freeman explores the meaning of life, God, and many big questions in between in an effort to understand how religion has evolved and shaped society. A different divine subject is covered in each hourlong episode, titles of which include "Creation," "The Devil Inside," "Afterlife," "Apocalypse," and "Who Is God?" To explore these topics, host and narrator Freeman visits nearly 20 cities in seven countries to see some of the world's greatest religious sites, among them Jerusalem's Wailing Wall, India's Bodhi Tree, Mayan temples in Guatemala, and the pyramids of Egypt, and he immerses himself in religious experiences and rituals. "In some places I found answers, and others led to more questions. The constant through it all is that we're all looking to be part of something bigger than us. If there's one thing I've learned, it's that we certainly are," Freeman says.
"It's the end of the world as we know it (and I feel fine)," sang R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe, and it's a proclamation that must resonate with the people profiled in this series. That's because they are all preparing for doomsday, whether it's caused by a natural disaster, a financial collapse or a nuclear winter, and their plan is to outlast and outlive any apocalyptic scenario. The series goes inside America's "prepping" subculture and introduces otherwise ordinary folks who are stockpiling food, water, weapons and whatever else they think is necessary in the event basic services should falter and society turns chaotic and violent. Also, each prepper's plan is reviewed by the consulting firm Practical Preppers, which analyzes its potential effectiveness in case the prepper's worst fears become reality.
Fishing for bluefin tuna is a way of life for many residents of Gloucester, Mass. "Wicked Tuna" takes viewers into the unrelenting North Atlantic waters infamously spotlighted by the novel-turned-feature film "The Perfect Storm," to follow captains who are relied upon by their families, their shipmates, and by Gloucester itself, to haul in boatloads of the large but elusive bluefin. The pressure to deliver is unforgiving -- the fishing season is short and tuna populations are dwindling -- but one "monstah" catch can reel in just as large of a payday.