Watch on YouTube TV

Dead End Express

Watch live TV from 70+ networks
Free unlimited cloud DVR storage space
6 accounts per household included
$49.99/month.
Cancel anytime.
From the dense woodlands of Montana's Flathead National Forest, to the isolated heart of Idaho's Hells Canyon, to the frozen wastelands of Alaska's high tundra, the adventurers profiled in this docu-reality series live their lives on the edge -- sometimes literally -- transporting essential supplies to an ever-changing cast of fellow off-gridders. Whether by packhorse, dog sled, powerboat, snowmobile or bush plane, the delivery method may differ, but the pioneers share a belief that no job is too tough. Jet boat operator Brice Barnes, packhorse rider Andy Breland, pilot Rob Kinkade, snowmobiler Roger Phillips, and dog musher Jeff Hemann are featured.

Latest episodes

aired 482 days ago
Freight hauler Roger Phillips battles a troublesome delivery; dog mushers Jeff and Paul Hemann set up the wilderness for a wedding; jet boat pilot Brice Barnes risks life and limb to collect a season's worth of firewood.
aired 538 days ago
Brice Barnes negotiates with mules and an unwieldy tank of propane; Jeff and Paul Hemann combine their dog teams to battle deep snow; Roger Phillips takes his wife on a tough delivery.
aired 545 days ago
Snow machine failures in plummeting temperatures; mushers struggle to control their lead dog en route to an important delivery.
aired 552 days ago
Brice Barnes tracks a cougar prowling around a friend's off-grid home; Roger Phillips braves the unstable frozen river to deliver some desperately needed fuel; Jeff and Paul Hemann haul some live chickens to a stranded off-gridder.
aired 784 days ago
Alaskan bush pilot Rob Kinkade gets a rescue call from a stranded friend; Montana packers Andy and Chuck ride into the wind to deliver supplies to an off-gridder; jet boat pilot Brice Barnes attempts to recover a helicopter in Hells Canyon.
aired 784 days ago
Racing a cargo of live fish to a lake before the tanks run out of oxygen; stranded campers low on rations; checking on an elderly off-gridder who hasn't been heard from; rebuilding a homestead destroyed by wildfire.
aired 784 days ago
Braving the Snake River to respond to an SOS call; delivering vital medical supplies; hauling cargo to a mountaintop fire tower.
aired 880 days ago
Answering a diabetic friend's SOS call; restoring a historic creek in the heart of Hells Canyon; transporting a gold prospector with heavy equipment; a refueling surprise leaves one hauler stranded.

Similar on YouTube TV

Each year adventurers make Alaska's mighty Yukon River their home for five weeks. They float downstream on homemade log rafts to sell firewood and other supplies to remote villages. The reality-documentary "Yukon River Run" presents hourlong episodes tracking the progress of various crews. As harsh winter months approach and threaten both safety and success, stakes are heightened as rafters endeavor to cash out and escape from the cold.
Various networks
Back to the beautiful state of Alaska for another reality-documentary series, this one set in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a protected area home to thousands of native animals... and a handful of people. In 1980, the U.S. government banned human occupation in the refuge, and only residents in seven permitted cabins are allowed to remain. The series depicts the daily rituals of four families living in isolation and contending with bitter weather, frustrating setbacks, and aggressive wildlife in an unspoiled and unforgiving wilderness. The nonconformists include Heimo Korth, the "godfather of the final frontier," and wife Edna; Bob Harte, who has spent 40 years living by his own rules; and young couple Bob and Ashley Selden, who admit that they've survived by trial and error, learning day by day the harsh reality of frontier living.
When bears, wolves and foxes are your only neighbors, life can be pretty lonely. Add minus-60-degree days and a constant battle for the most basic necessities, and you have the daily challenges of people who live in remote corners of Alaska. This series takes viewers deep into an Alaskan winter to meet tough, resilient residents as they try to stay one step ahead of storms and man-eating beasts to survive the season. The closest neighbor to Sue Aikens is more than 300 miles away. Eric Salitan subsists solely on what he hunts and forages. Chip and Agnes Hailstone catch fish for currency in bartering for supplies, and Andy and Kate Bassich use their pack of sled dogs for transportation. Also highlighted is a time of year not always part of what viewers see in Alaska: spring! Ice is breaking, animals are waking, and residents face new tests before deep cold returns.
Various networks
Deep in the backcountry of Idaho lies a protected wilderness area known as the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness. It encompasses a total of 2,366,757 acres, and it is the largest contiguous wilderness in the lower 48 states. The stunning region is characterized by rugged mountains, deep canyons and roaring rivers. The only direct way to access this area is a flight through steep canyons on a bush plane or a jet-boat journey through Class 5 whitewater rapids on the Salmon River. The wilderness area is home to a small community of homesteaders who are dependent on the pilots, boat captains and each other to survive. Discovery Channel's "River of No Return" introduces viewers to these homesteaders who rely on themselves, their neighbors and their survival skills to live life on their own terms in one of America's last frontiers.
The producers of National Geographic Channel's hit series "Life Below Zero" are behind "Port Protection," which profiles individuals trying to survive way above the Lower 48. Surrounded by the North Pacific, Port Protection is a remote community tucked into the northwest corner of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. The approximately 100 residents who call the rugged, unforgiving land home push the limits of survival, living an isolated and risky existence of self-reliance with no roads, government or law enforcement. However, they think the risk is worth the profound reward: a world of beauty with the security of community without the constraints of bureaucracy.
Fishing for bluefin tuna is a way of life for many residents of Gloucester, Mass. "Wicked Tuna" takes viewers into the unrelenting North Atlantic waters infamously spotlighted by the novel-turned-feature film "The Perfect Storm," to follow captains who are relied upon by their families, their shipmates, and by Gloucester itself, to haul in boatloads of the large but elusive bluefin. The pressure to deliver is unforgiving -- the fishing season is short and tuna populations are dwindling -- but one "monstah" catch can reel in just as large of a payday.