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From the producers of the multiple-award-winning miniseries "The Men Who Built America," National Geographic Channel chronicles competitions in innovation that pit history's brightest minds in the race to lay claim to the future. For them, the greatest challenge wasn't beating the odds -- it was beating their adversaries. From Steve Jobs vs. Bill Gates to William Hurst vs. Joseph Pulitzer, each hourlong episode focuses on a specific rivalry, delving into fierce power struggles, deceit, fluke timing and raw ambition out of which great ideas turned into reality. The conflicts play out through re-enactments that feature interviews with modern-day visionaries like Bill Nye, Steve Wozniak, Jack Welch, Steve Wynn and Michio Kaku.

Latest episodes

aired 1,054 days ago
Insight into the heated rivalry between the Wright brothers and Glenn Curtiss in the race for flight that laid the groundwork for modern aviation.
aired 1,055 days ago
The struggle between America and the Soviet Union in a race to conquer the moon; a competition that resulted in brilliant feats of engineering and unparalleled technological advancements.
aired 1,062 days ago
A look at the battle between inventors Bill Gates and Steve Jobs to dominate a new age and bring the personal computer to all.
aired 1,076 days ago
The newspaper's rise to prominence was born out of a bitter rivalry between publishers William Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer, who changed the media world by pushing journalism to the limits, compromising in order to keep their empires afloat.
aired 1,077 days ago
The gritty competition between American inventors David Sarnoff and Philo Farnsworth, the results of which forever changed the world of media.
aired 1,083 days ago
Physicists Werner Heisenberg and Robert Oppenheimer strive to harness the laws of physics in order to create the most powerful weapon the world has ever seen, the atomic bomb.
aired 1,097 days ago
Inventors Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison compete to harness the power of electric current in a war that would determine who would power the world's future.
aired 1,104 days ago
American inventors Samuel Colt and Daniel Wesson race to create the perfect revolver, resulting in patents that would revolutionize the firearm industry and change how wars are fought.

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