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Alaska: The Last Frontier: Kilchers Revealed

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Cameras follow the extended Kilcher family, descendants of Swiss immigrants, at their homestead outside of Homer, Alaska.

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Charlotte and August run into a snowstorm while searching for a newborn calf; Eivin and Eve go ice fishing on Caribou Lake.
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As the first storm pummels the homestead, Otto and Atz, Sr. lead cattle across flooded glacial rivers; Atz Lee and Jane must move an outhouse.
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The Kilcher family lives on a 600-acre homestead in Alaska; the family tries to squeeze in a hunting trip before winter.

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The breathtaking beauty of Alaska sometimes hides the fact its winters can be incredibly harsh, especially for those who live in the state's outlying areas. "Alaska: The Last Frontier" perfectly illustrates this reality, as the series profiles life for the Kilcher family in the isolated community of Homer. For four generations the Kilchers have lived off what their 600-acre homestead has provided, but cultivating that living is never easy. Led by patriarch Atz Kilcher and his brother Otto, the family spends the short summer and fall gardening, hunting and fishing for food, gathering supplies from the land and preparing their animals for the winter. Viewers, who may or may not have a fancy phone by their side while watching on their big-screen high-def TV, also see the Kilchers living off the grid, where running water and electricity aren't daily staples, nor is contact with the outside world. Atz, by the way, is the father of music superstar Jewel.
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