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Africa's Wild Havens

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The wilds of the world have always been magnificent and those of Africa are no exception. These tall giants provide shade in the blistering heat and shelter to animals desperate to escape the scorching heat. They provide haven to herbivores and predators alike -- these are the miracle trees of Africa and include the sausage tree of Zambia, the marula of the Manyeleti, and the camel thorn of the Kalahari. All of these have uniquely evolved to their environments and Africa's extremes, each hosts a haven for the varying animals of the savannas.

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The fruit and flowers from a rare tree in Africa provide sustenance for the animals during the dry season.
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The camelthorn tree provides life to creatures that dwell in Africa's Kalahari.
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The marula tree is considered a tree of life in Africa's Manyeleti game reserve.

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