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Abandoned

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Most people who drive by an abandoned building see, well, an abandoned building. Jay Chaikin sees dollar signs. This series follows Chaikin and his partners Dan Graham and Mark Pakenas as they scour through dark, dank and dilapidated structures across the U.S. in hopes of uncovering forgotten pieces of American history. For every item they uncover in such places as the former Pabst Brewing Co. headquarters in Milwaukee, a grist mill in Maryland, and a 170-year-old church in Philadelphia, Chaikin must negotiate its sale from the building's owners, a process that can be the hardest part of his job. But he rarely leaves any site empty-handed. He takes what he buys back to his workshop in Pennsylvania to refurbish before reselling them.

Latest episodes

aired 882 days ago
Searching for lost history in an abandoned Appalachian frontier homestead.
aired 882 days ago
Jay and his team search for treasures in an abandoned cotton gin.
aired 882 days ago
Jay and the crew visit a 19th-century beer castle where they hope to find lost treasures of brewery baron Capt. Pabst.
aired 882 days ago
An abandoned Gothic church is scheduled to be demolished.
aired 882 days ago
The search for riches in an historic abandoned bank that was built to hold the fortunes of America's oil barons.
aired 882 days ago
The historic Majestic Hotel in Hot Springs, Ark., was frequented for its luxury spas.
aired 889 days ago
An abandoned paper factory the size of several football fields contains an assortment of historic items.
aired 889 days ago
Marble from this factory was used in the building of the U.S. Supreme Court Building, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Jefferson Memorial.
aired 889 days ago
Jay, Dan and Mark explore an entire abandoned village.
aired 889 days ago
A trek through a spooky Masonic retirement home reveals a treasure trove of automotive relics.
aired 896 days ago
The Old MacDonald farm includes a farmhouse, barn and mill that contain many historic items.
aired 896 days ago
Historic treasures in a shuttered silk mill that's been abandoned since 1957.
aired 896 days ago
The abandoned Scranton Lace Factory, founded in 1897, flourished for more than 100 years.

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