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Viewers hand down the verdict on some of the nation's most controversial civil cases in this landmark reality series. Each week, six top prosecution and defense attorneys question and cross-examine litigants and witnesses while they present their arguments to America and to LaDoris Cordell, a former judge of the Superior Court of California. The cases address hot button issues of today and examine the laws and intense human stories behind them. Closing arguments are presented by the plaintiffs and the defendants as they sit across from each other. Once the cases are presented, it's up to America to decide who will prevail. Jeanine Pirro, from FOX News, hosts.

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