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Wicked Tuna: Outer Banks

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When bluefin tuna season ends in Gloucester, Mass., it's just beginning in North Carolina's Outer Banks, a perfect opportunity to pit North vs. South in a pro fisherman contest for the ocean's most lucrative prey. Venturing south are the best crews from Gloucester to take on top local fleets in the treacherous Outer Banks, where the weather is more unpredictable than up north, and the seas can be extremely rough. The Gloucester rod-and-reel vets must master "greensticking" -- trolling artificial squid from a 30-foot fiberglass pole to lure the elusive species to the surface. Top-dollar bluefin can be worth as much as $20,000 each, but a short season and small government catch quota means explosive rivalries surface quickly.

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