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To Tell the Truth

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Anthony Anderson hosts this re-imagining of the of the classic game show of the same name, where a panel of celebrities is presented with three people who all claim to be the same person with a notable talent, job or achievement. The celebrities have an opportunity to question each of the people before they take turns guessing who they think is telling the truth. Anderson's mother, Doris, keeps score, and the celebrity who performs the worst on each episode must post a lie about himself or herself on his or her twitter account.

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