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The Gong Show

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Comic Tommy Maitland hosts as performers -- including contortionists, singers, magicians, dancers, comics, painters, and even people who work with scary bugs -- try to impress a rotating panel of three celebrity judges. If any of the judges deem an act to be less than worthy of a score, they can pick up a mallet and hit the giant gong that is hanging behind them and end the performance. If the judges are happy with the act, they will let it play out until the end and present their scores. At the end of each show, the act with the highest scores receives a trophy and a check for $2,000.17.

Latest episodes

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Celebrity judges Isla Fisher, Will Arnett and Courteney Cox.
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Celebrity judges Joel McHale, Priyanka Chopra and Wendi McLendon-Covey.
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Celebrity judges Will Arnett, Jennifer Aniston and Jack Black.
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Celebrity judges Megan Fox, Andy Samberg and Maya Rudolph.
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Celebrity judges Chelsea Handler, Will Arnett and Ken Marino.
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Celebrity judges Rob Riggle, Ken Jeong and Regina Hall.
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Celebrity judges Ed Helms, Alison Brie and Will Arnett.
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Celebrity judges Dana Carvey, Tracee Ellis Ross and Anthony Anderson.
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Celebrity panelists include Fred Armisen, Elizabeth Banks and Will Forte.
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Celebrity panelists include Will Arnett, Ken Jeong and Zach Galifianakis.

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