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Little Life on the Prairie

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Leaving a stressful city life in California to raise their family in the countryside of Arizona was an easy decision for Lauren and Nate Webnar. What promises to be more difficult is starting a farm from scratch, adjusting to country life and expanding their family despite major health risks and medical challenges. Lauren, Nate and their 4-year-old daughter Juniper were born with achondroplasia dwarfism, but that hasn't stopped them from chasing big dreams. "Little Life on the Prairie" documents the Webnar's new life in Arizona, including a major storyline involving the use of genetic testing to help ensure Lauren's healthy pregnancy.

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The Webnars are very excited to learn the results of the genetic testing of Lauren's fertilized embryos; Nate's parents come for a tour of the farm.
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It's Christmastime and the only gift Lauren and Nate want is to have viable embryos; Nate hopes the charm of a small town Christmas will help Lauren embrace country life; adventure ensues when the family look for a tree to cut down in the desert.
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Nate and Lauren continue their IVF journey; Lauren starts hormone injections to prepare for egg retrieval surgery; Nate worries when the procedure takes longer than expected; Lauren signs up Juniper for ballet class, but worries about bullying.
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Lauren, Nate and daughter Juniper are a family of little people with big dreams of ditching city life to start a farm in the country; after two past pregnancies ended in heartbreak, Nate and Lauren begin an emotional journey to expand their family.

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