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Successful businesspeople have a lot that they can teach aspiring entrepreneurs and others who are trying to get into the business world. On "Follow the Leader," business journalist and author Farnoosh Torabi tries to get inside the heads of giants in the industry to know what it took for them to get to where they are today. She is embedded within executives' worlds to learn how they operate and discover the unique philosophies and methods they used to achieve their success -- and which viewers can apply to their own lives. Featured executives include VaynerMedia CEO Gary Vaynerchuk and Warby Parker co-founders/CEOs Neil Blumenthal and Dave Gilboa.

Latest episodes

aired 117 days ago
Farnoosh follows the co-founder of John Paul Mitchell Systems from his corporate LA office to his home in Texas as he attempts to build his third billion-dollar brand, Aubio Life Science.
aired 188 days ago
Farnoosh follows former fitness trainer Tracy Anderson, founder of Tracy Anderson Method, as she must decide whether to sacrifice the quality of her company's organic energy bars in order to cut costs.
aired 195 days ago
Farnoosh seeks out Neil Blumenthal and Dave Gilboa, co-CEOs and co-founders of Warby Parker, an eyeglass company in the process of expanding its billion-dollar online business by establishing physical storefronts.
aired 202 days ago
Farnoosh spends time with Katia Beauchamp, founder of the beauty box subscription service Birchbox, as she attempts to change customers' perceptions and entice more users to utilize the company's website.
aired 209 days ago
Farnoosh spends time with social media ad expert Gary Vaynerchuk to discover the secrets that helped him increase the value of his parents' wine business twenty times over and lead the multi-million-dollar company VaynerMedia.
aired 223 days ago
Farnoosh follows the co-founder of 300 Entertainment to discover how his new label makes a profit and whether he can persuade rapper Young Thug to let another artist add vocals to his latest piece.

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