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Dragons' Den

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Budding entrepreneurs get three minutes to pitch their business ideas to five multimillionaires who are willing to invest their own cash to kick-start the businesses in the original "Shark Tank." After each pitch, the Dragons have the opportunity to ask questions about the venture. The entrepreneurs don't always have to answer, but of course what they choose not to address could very well affect the outcome. The pitch is over when each of the Dragons has declared,"I'm out." Evan Davis hosts.

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Young entrepreneurs' suit-tailoring business; energy drink business.
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Budding entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to wealthy investors, hoping to gain investment capital.
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Budding entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to wealthy investors, hoping to gain investment capital.
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The dragons are shown five eco-friendly coffins and meet a pop star's daughter with an online shopping service for men.
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A group of break dancers introduces the dragons to some innovative earphones.
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A young photo-booth company offers the dragons the chance to capture their time in the den; Deborah takes a stroll on a lawn to test out a new stiletto accessory.
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A returning entrepreneur has a new outdoor space-saving device; a golfing duo have a new take on the traditional tee.
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A young entrepreneur's garden shed invention; a Kent-based gaming entrepreneur; greetings product.
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A product uses nano-suction technology; a marshmallow lover's gourmet treats.
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University friends' home brew cider kits; a loose-leaf tea company; an economics student's nutty preserve.
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A colorful Indian dance troupe; taxidermy.
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A toe-tapping pitch gets the Dragons on their feet.
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A London-based entrepreneur's new take on a post-it note; business women bring in a pair of alpacas.
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A Glasgow-based businessman's energy saving device; a London mother's confidence-building children's toy.
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A Ghanaian entrepreneur's chocolate drink; a Welsh couple wants to change sleeping habits with woolen duvets.
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A Yorkshire couple presents a glamorous camping business; a mother's new take on the coffee bag.
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A triathlete's sports recovery drink; a taxi-booking app.
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A youth-oriented package holiday business; a Bulgarian inventor of a self-filling bath.
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Recent graduates' campus styling.
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A Dragon joins in on a musical pitch; an entrepreneur's all-pink car care range.
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A Glasgow couple demonstrates their yoga franchise.
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Former ad-men offer a tough quizzing.
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A crooning Texan cowboy backed by his country band; a husband and wife team's dance troupe.
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An Australian tanning range with a surprising jingle.

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