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Cash Explosion

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This show from legendary Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions features two contestants trying to predict answers to survey questions for the opportunity to play a game with oversized playing cards for a chance to win cash. One contestant guesses how many people (out of 100) gave a certain answer to a question and the other contestant then guesses if the number is higher or lower than the opponent's guess. The winning contestant then faces a row of cards and must determine if each succeeding card is higher or lower than the one that precedes it. The contestant who wins two out of three games wins the match and plays the bonus round, called Money Cards. The Money Cards round is similar to the card game in the main game but with three levels of cards instead of one row. The contestant is given $200 at the beginning of Money Cards and wagers any or all of that money when guessing if the cards will be higher or lower than the previous one. A perfect round could earn the contestant $28,800.
Contestants guess hidden phrases by guessing letters one at a time. Contestants win money or prizes, as determined by a spin of the wheel, for each correct consonant they guess. But they have to pay to see what vowels are in a puzzle. The contestant that has amassed the most winnings at the end of a game goes on to play the bonus round, in which the player can win even more -- prizes frequently seen in the bonus round include automobiles, vacations and more cash.
Marshal Matt Dillon (then-newcomer James Arness) tries to prevent lawlessness from overtaking Dodge City, Kansas. Helping to keep him grounded are saloon proprietor Miss Kitty Russell and Doc Adams. The television series grew out of the long-running radio serial of the same name, although for a short time they were both on the airwaves.
Correctly answering 14 multiple-choice questions could net contestants $1 million on a half-hour quiz show that's had a long run since its adaptation from the Brit show with the same name. Its format has evolved, but the basics remain: Answer trivia questions to win what could be very big bucks. Safety nets along the way guarantee sums that can't be lost once a contestant reaches certain thresholds -- and players can quit any time, but going for the million carries the risk of losing hundreds of thousands with one wrong answer. Contestants get "lifelines" to help reach the top.